Sunday, May 19, 2024

How To Know You Have Rheumatoid Arthritis

Ra Symptoms In Your Joints

Rheumatoid Arthritis – Signs & Symptoms | Johns Hopkins Medicine

RA almost always affects your joints. It may take a few weeks or months for the first signs to show. The inflammation it causes often leads to these three hallmark symptoms:

  • Pain.Inflammation inside a joint makes it hurt whether youâre moving it or not. Over time, it causes damage and pain.
  • Swelling. Fluid in the joint makes it puffy and tender.
  • Tenderness. It hurts when you move or push on a joint.

Other RA symptoms include:

  • Stiffness. The joint is harder to use and doesnt move as well as it should. Itâs especially common in the morning. Although many people with other forms of arthritis have stiff joints in the morning, it takes people with rheumatoid arthritis more than an hour before their joints feel loose.
  • Redness and warmth. The joints may be warmer and have color changes related to the inflammation.

What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis And Some Of The First Symptoms Of The Disorder

Its an autoimmune disease in which a persons own immune system gets confused and starts to attack them. The immune system does damage to the joints. Early signs and symptoms include joint pain and swelling. Commonly affected joints are in your hands, wrists, elbows, feet and ankles. If a swollen joint also has stiffness in the morning that lasts more than an hour, that is a huge red flag.

What Are The Goals Of Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis

The most important goal of treating rheumatoid arthritis is to reduce joint pain and swelling. Doing so should help maintain or improve joint function. The long-term goal of treatment is to slow or stop joint damage. Controlling joint inflammation reduces your pain and improves your quality of life.

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Your Injuries Seem To Take A Long Time To Heal

Its possible to think you have an injurysuch as a sprained ankle that doesnt seem to healwhen the symptoms are actually due to RA.

This is more common in younger people, says Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, assistant attending rheumatologist at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City.

One day a patient is playing soccer and the next day her knee is swollen, she says. I have seen people who have had two arthroscopic surgeries and extensive physical therapy in their knee and they have rheumatoid arthritis.

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How Is Ra Treated

You Know You Have Rheumatoid Arthritis When

RA can be effectively treated and managed with medication and self-management strategies. Treatment for RA usually includes the use of medications that slow disease and prevent joint deformity, called disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs biological response modifiers are medications that are an effective second-line treatment. In addition to medications, people can manage their RA with self-management strategies proven to reduce pain and disability, allowing them to pursue the activities important to them. People with RA can relieve pain and improve joint function by learning to use five simple and effective arthritis management strategies.

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What You Need To Know About Arthritis

When you think of arthritis, you probably picture an elderly person with aching fingers. You may have heard that cracking your knuckles gives you arthritis. But, lets get the facts straight.

Arthritis doesnt only target the elderly. More than 50 million adults and 300,000 children have some type of arthritis, according to the Arthritis Foundation. Experts there also state that the condition is more common in people who have other chronic conditions. Consider these arthritis statistics:

  • 49 percent of adults with heart disease have arthritis.
  • 47 percent of adults with diabetes have arthritis.
  • 31 percent of adults who are obese have arthritis.

So, what is arthritis? Vijayabhanu Mahadevan, MD, is a rheumatologist who sees patients in Phoenix. She explains it is a pain and swelling in your joints.

Assessing Your Physical Ability

If you have been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, your specialist will do an assessment to see how well you’re coping with everyday tasks.

You may be asked to fill in a questionnaire on how well you can do things like dress, walk and eat, and how good your grip strength is.

This assessment may be repeated after your treatment, to see if you have made any improvements.

Further information

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Does Ra Cause Hair Loss

People with autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, can experience hair loss as a troubling symptom of their disease. Other times though, the cause of the shedding locks could be the medications used to treat the disease.

Does rheumatoid arthritis make you tired? People with rheumatoid arthritis typically have several permanently inflamed joints. The inflammation inside the body can lead to general physical weakness, drowsiness and exhaustion. This feeling of extreme tiredness is also called fatigue. Some people find this to be the worst symptom of the disease.

Does rheumatoid arthritis show up on xrays?

X-rays can show whether joint damage you have, though damage may not show up early on. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound give a more detailed picture of your joints. These scans arent normally used to diagnose RA, but they can help doctors find it early.

How do doctors diagnose rheumatoid arthritis? Rheumatoid arthritis can be difficult to diagnose in its early stages because the early signs and symptoms mimic those of many other diseases. There is no one blood test or physical finding to confirm the diagnosis. During the physical exam, your doctor will check your joints for swelling, redness and warmth.

The Number Of Swollen Painful Joints You Have Is An Indicator Of Disease Severity

5 Warning Signs of Rheumatoid Arthritis

The more joints that are painful and swollen, the more severe the disease may be, says Dr. Cush. Joint pain and swelling are characteristic signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatologists consider this a very important way to measure disease severity.

Your doctor should examine joints in your hands, feet, shoulders, hips, elbows, and other spots to see how many are causing problems. Symmetrical symptoms, such as having the same swollen joints on both sides of the body, are also hallmark symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, Cush says.

Dr. Domingues adds that the traditional morning stiffness and joint swelling that are characteristic symptoms of RA should be discussed with a rheumatologist as soon as possible. Those are signs of active rheumatoid arthritis, and when it presents like that, it gives doctors an opportunity to be aggressive in early treatment or to switch to another class of drugs if symptoms are worsening.

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Blood Tests For Rheumatoid Arthritis

There are several types of blood tests that help your healthcare provider or rheumatologist determine whether you have RA. These tests include:

  • Rheumatoid factor test. The RF blood test checks for a protein called rheumatoid factor. High levels of rheumatoid factor are associated with autoimmune diseases, especially RA.
  • Anticitrullinated peptide antibody test . This test looks for an antibody thats associated with RA. People who have this antibody usually have the disease. However, not everyone with RA tests positive for this antibody. The anti-CCP test is more specific for RA than the RF blood test, and often is positive before the RF test.
  • Antinuclear antibody test. The antinuclear antibody panel tests your immune system to see if its producing antibodies to the nucleus of cells. Your body often makes ANA antibodies as a response to many different types of autoimmune conditions, including RA.
  • Erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The ESR test helps determine the degree of inflammation in your body. The result tells your doctor whether inflammation is present. However, it doesnt indicate the cause or site of the inflammation.
  • C-reactive protein test. A severe infection or significant inflammation anywhere in your body can trigger your liver to make C-reactive protein. High levels of this inflammatory marker are associated with RA.

What Causes Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease. This means that your immune system which usually fights infection attacks the cells that line your joints by mistake, making them swollen, stiff and painful.

Over time, this can damage the joint itself, the cartilage and nearby bone.

Its not clear what triggers this problem with the immune system, although you are at an increased risk if you are a woman, you have a family history of rheumatoid arthritis, or you smoke.

Read more about the causes of rheumatoid arthritis.

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Are There Any Home Remedies For Rheumatoid Arthritis

If someone has joint pain or stiffness, he or she may think it is just a normal part of getting older and that there is nothing he or she can do. Nothing could be further from the truth. There are several options for medical treatment and even more to help prevent further joint damage and symptoms. Discuss these measures with a health-care professional to find ways to make them work.

  • First of all, dont delay diagnosis or treatment. Having a correct diagnosis allows a health-care professional to form a treatment plan. Delaying treatment increases the risk that the arthritis will get worse and that serious complications will develop.
  • Learn everything about rheumatoid arthritis. If there are any questions, ask a health-care professional. If any questions remain, ask the health-care professional to provide reliable sources of information. Some resources are listed later in this article.
  • Know the pros and cons of all of treatment options, and work with a health-care professional to decide on the best options. Understand the treatment plan and what benefits and side effects can be expected.
  • Learn about the symptoms. If someone has rheumatoid arthritis, he or she probably has both general discomfort and pain in specific joints. Learn to tell the difference. Pain in a specific joint often results from overuse. Pain in a joint that lasts more than one hour after an activity probably means that that activity was too stressful and should be avoided.

Increase physical activity.

What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms Causes Diagnosis Treatment And Prevention

Caring for patients with rheumatoid arthritis in the community ...

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints. Within the body, joints are the points where bones come together and allow for movement. Most of these joints those called synovial joints also provide shock absorption.

RA is an autoimmune condition, in which your immune system mistakes the linings of your joints as “foreign” and attacks and damages them, resulting in inflammation and pain.

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The Signs And Symptoms Of Ra

Luckily, the signs and symptoms of early onset RA ARE heavily documented. Experts agree that the most common initial symptoms are as follows:

  • You begin to experience a general feeling of pain or stiffness in your joints.
  • Your joints begin to swell or turn red on a regular basis even when youre not engaged in heavily physical activities.
  • These symptoms extend to four or more of your joints, including those in your hands and fingers.
  • Your symptoms are symmetrical meaning that they equally affect both the left and right sides of your body.
  • You experience a general sense of stiffness in your entire body when you wake up in the morning that often lasts for a half hour or more.
  • Any of the above physical symptoms last for longer than six months in a row.

If you begin to experience any of these initial signs, you should absolutely consult your doctor to schedule a physical examination. Dont continue to ignore your body. Its trying to tell you something is wrong. Outside of the symptoms directly associated with RA, there are a number of indirect signs to be on the lookout for, too. These include, but are not limited to, ones like:

What Tests Are Done For Rheumatoid Arthritis

The diagnosis of RA is based on a person’s clinical signs and symptoms, but it is supported by laboratory tests, including X-rays and various blood tests, including but not exclusively the rheumatoid factor, anti-CCP.

If a person exhibits a clinical pattern of symptoms and signs that suggestive they have rheumatoid arthritis, a variety X-rays and blood tests will be performed. Certain blood tests can help to confirm the diagnosis, but a negative test does not necessarily mean a person does not have RA.

Approximately half of people developing rheumatoid arthritis will have blood test results that demonstrate inflammation. These tests are called acute phase reactants. Examples of these are an erythrocyte sedimentation rate and a C-reactive protein . These tests are performed to assess the activity of the disease in combination with an assessment of the patients symptoms and physical findings.

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Things To Know About Rheumatoid Arthritis

Here are 10 things you need to know about Rheumatoid Arthritis.

1. Its Not Your Grandma’s Arthritis
2. Early, Aggressive Treatment Is Best
3. Remission Is Possible
4. Protect Your Heart
5. Exercise Can Be Medicine
6. Watch Out for Flares
7. Fight Fatigue
8. You Might Not Look Sick
9. Talk to Your Doctor
10. Look Out for Number One

Hello,

Numbness Or Tingling In Your Hands

What type of arthritis do you have? A Rheumatologist explains.

One sign of rheumatoid arthritis is carpal tunnel syndrome, which is marked by tingling in the wrist and hands. The sensation is similar to the feeling you get when you hit your funny bone, said Dr. Mandl.

This happens because the swelling in the arm compresses the nerves going into the hands. The sensation is often worse at night.

If you go to a healthcare provider with these symptoms and don’t have other RA symptoms, you may be diagnosed with only carpal tunnel syndrome.

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What Is The Safest Drug For Rheumatoid Arthritis

The safest drug for rheumatoid arthritis is one that gives you the most benefit with the least amount of negative side effects. This varies depending on your health history and the severity of your RA symptoms. Your healthcare provider will work with you to develop a treatment program. The drugs your healthcare provider prescribes will match the seriousness of your condition.

Its important to meet with your healthcare provider regularly. Theyll watch for any side effects and change your treatment, if necessary. Your healthcare provider may order tests to determine how effective your treatment is and if you have any side effects.

How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated

Joint damage generally occurs within the first two years of diagnosis, so its important to see your provider if you notice symptoms. Treating rheumatoid arthritis in this window of opportunity can help prevent long-term consequences.

Treatments for rheumatoid arthritis include lifestyle changes, therapies, medicine and surgery. Your provider considers your age, health, medical history and how bad your symptoms are when deciding on a treatment.

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Types Of Rheumatoid Arthritis

There are two main types of rheumatoid arthritis:

  • Rheumatoid factor positive aka seropositive RA
  • Rheumatoid factor negative aka seronegative RA

The difference between the two is whether rheumatoid factor, a special protein, or certain antibodies can be found in the blood or not . Most rheumatoid arthritis cases are seropositive, while seronegative cases are typically milder, cause fewer flare-ups, and progress slower.

Whats The Age Of Onset For Rheumatoid Arthritis

You Know You Have Rheumatoid Arthritis When

RA usually starts to develop between the ages of 30 and 60. But anyone can develop rheumatoid arthritis. In children and young adults usually between the ages of 16 and 40 its called young-onset rheumatoid arthritis . In people who develop symptoms after they turn 60, its called later-onset rheumatoid arthritis .

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How Does Arthritis Feel

Arthritis usually causes stiffness pain and fatigue. The severity varies from person to person and even from day to day. In some people only a few joints are affected and the impact may be small. In other people the entire body system may be affected.

The joints of the body are the site of much of the action in arthritis. Many types of arthritis show signs of joint inflammation: swelling, stiffness, tenderness, redness or warmth. These joint symptoms may be accompanied by weight loss, fever or weakness.

When these symptoms last for more than two weeks, inflammatory arthritis such as rheumatoid arthritis may be the cause. Joint inflammation may also be caused by infection which can lead to septic arthritis. Degenerative joint disease is the most common type of arthritis joint inflammation is not a prominent feature of this condition. While normal joints can support a vast amount of use, mechanical abnormalities of a joint make it susceptible to degeneration.

It is healthy for you to keep active and move your joints. If you do not move a joint regularly, the muscles around it weaken and/or become tight. The joint can stiffen or even freeze. When you do try to move the joint and muscles hurt because they have been still for so long.

Arthritis can make it hard to do the movements you rely on every day for work or taking care of your family.

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Can Ra And Oa Co

It is possible to have both RA and OA. OA is more likely to occur as you age, and people with RA are at risk for OA as they get older. It is also possible to have elderly-onset RA years after being diagnosed with OA.

According to a 2018 report in the journal Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal Disease, elderly onset RA, or geriatric RA, begins after age 65. It presents with more systemic symptoms and more frequently affects large joints rather than the small joints of the hands and feet.

When these conditions co-exist, diagnosing and treating both conditions can be challenging. Both patients and doctors have difficulty differentiating between pain caused by either condition, says Dr. Lee. That can lead to function and mobility problems and delayed treatment.

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