Wednesday, September 28, 2022

What Type Of Arthritis Affects Finger Joints

Finger And Wrist Arthritis

Arthritis Of The Fingers – Everything You Need To Know – Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

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Finger and wrist arthritis affect every aspect of your life, from your ability to do your job to the time you spend on hobbies. At TriHealth Orthopedic & Sports Institute and Beacon Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, our goal is to get you back to doing the activities you love. We take the time to get to know our patients so that we can provide unique care plans that are customized to your needs.

What Are The Symptoms Of Arthritis In The Hands

Early symptoms include:

  • Dull or burning joint pain, appearing hours or a day after increased use of your hands.
  • Morning pain and stiffness in your hand.
  • Swollen joints in your hand.

If you’ve had arthritis in your hand for some time:

  • Symptoms are present more often.
  • Pain may change from dull ache to sharp pain.
  • Pain may wake you up at night.
  • Pain may cause you to change the way you use your hand.
  • Tissue surrounding your affected joint may become red and tender to the touch.
  • Youll feel grating, grinding, cracking or clicking when bending your fingers.
  • Your fingers cant fully open and close.
  • Small bony nodules form on the middle joint of your fingers or at the top joints of your fingers .
  • Your finger joints become large and deformed and abnormally bent, leaving your hands weak and less able to accomplish everyday tasks.

Using Ring Splints To Support Finger Joints

Learn how ring splints help provide stability and improve alignment in the finger joints for people with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Using Ring Splints to Support Finger Joints

What Do Ring Splints Do?

Some people with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis may not be able to straighten a finger joint, which can make grasping difficult or putting on gloves downright impossible. In others, an inflamed tendon may cause a finger to feel locked in a bent position, causing pain and reducing function. Ring splints can be worn on any of the fingers to help these problems and other deformities, such as joints that become stuck in a hyperextended position or instability at the knuckles, which lets fingers cross under or over each other.

According to Cynthia Garris, an occupational therapist and inventor of silver ring splints, joint destruction and disease can affect the alignment of ligaments and cause joint instability. This creates a loss of support and decrease in power. Ring splints stabilize the finger and control the movement of the joint in its normal range.

Swelling and pain are precursors to joint instability, so if you notice youre starting to have these symptoms in your hands, tell your doctor youd like to have an occupational therapist or certified hand therapist evaluate your hands and advise you about the benefits of a ring splint, says Garris. Once a joint becomes fused splints are no longer useful.

Ring Splint Styles and Types

Managing Pain

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Other Conditions That Can Cause Hand Pain Include:

Carpal tunnel syndrome

Rheumatoid arthritis can raise your risk of this condition, but many other factors can contribute as well, including anatomy of your wrist, nerve-damaging diseases and possibly repetitive hand motions. Its tricky because you could have carpal tunnel syndrome that is related to RA or not at all related to RA.

What Are The Early Signs Of Arthritis In The Hands

Finger Arthritis Vector Illustration Healthy And Disease Affected ...

The early symptoms of arthritis may vary depending on several factors such as the type of arthritis, age of the individual and which joint is involved.

Some of the early signs and symptoms of hand arthritis include

  • Stiffness in the joints, especially in the morning
  • Pain or ache in the affected area
  • Swelling at the affected site
  • The skin over the affected joint that may appear red and inflamed
  • Loss of function of the involved joint or muscle
  • A grating sensation or popping sound when the joint moves
  • Loss of muscle mass at the affected site
  • Presence of small, bony bump-like swellings on the hand
  • The skin over the affected joint may be warm to the touch
  • Psoriatic arthritis
  • Deformities in the affected hands and fingers
  • Fever, if the arthritis is due to an infection

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How Rheumatoid Arthritis Affects Your Hands

Many joints are covered with a lining called the synovium, which lubricates the joint so it moves more easily. When you have rheumatoid arthritis, the synovium becomes inflamed, thickens, and produces an excess of joint fluid. This is known as synovitis. That extra fluid along with the inflammatory chemicals released by the immune system causes swelling, damages cartilage, and softens the bone within the joint. The swollen tissue may stretch the surrounding ligaments, resulting in deformity and instability, according to the American Society for Surgery of the Hand. The inflammation may also weaken and damage tendons. Ligaments are connective tissues that join two bones tendons are connective issues that join muscle to bone.

When RA strikes the hand, it is most common in the wrist and finger knuckles more specifically the MCP joint, or the large knuckle where the fingers and thumb meet the hand, and the PIP joint, or middle knuckle, explains Jemima Albayda, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Rheumatology at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore.

The first knuckle at the top of the finger closest to the nails the DIP, or distal interphalangeal joint is generally spared in RA. In the wrist, RA often affects the joint between the two bones of the forearm, the radius and ulna.

How Will I Know If I Have Finger Arthritis

Your finger has three joints: One at the base, one in the middle, and one toward the fingertip. Arthritis can affect any of them causing a range of uncomfortable symptoms in your finger.

The first symptoms you may notice are stiffness and a dull, achy pain in your finger. Swelling is another common symptom of finger arthritis. Sometimes, you may feel grinding or grating when you use a finger joint. As your arthritis progresses, you may notice bony nodules at the affected joints. You may also see deformities in your finger. Your finger may seem bent to the side at a joint or it may appear to be permanently flexed or bent down at a joint.

Often, your doctor can tell that you have finger arthritis simply by looking at your hands and from your symptoms, especially significant swelling, nodules over your joints, or finger deformity. Your doctor may also recommend some tests to verify your diagnosis. These include blood tests and other lab tests, X-rays, and other tests that make a picture of your bones and joints, such as a bone scan.

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Which Joints In The Hand Are Affected

The index and middle fingers and the thumb are the parts of the hand most commonly affected. Many people find that the hand they use most is affected more than the other.

When the fingers are affected, it may be in the joints closest to the fingernails or the ones in the middle of the fingers. It’s less common to have osteoarthritis in the large knuckle joints, where the fingers meet the hand.

The joint at the base of the thumb can also be affected by osteoarthritis. And occasionally the wrist joint may be affected.

Surgery For Trigger Finger

What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

If conservative treatment measures aren’t enough to make your symptoms go away, you may need surgery. The hand surgeon will cut the pulley to help the tendon glide smoothly, without catching or locking. You won’t need a splint or cast but you’ll need to protect the incision site from water to prevent infection. After four to eight weeks, you may experience some internal tissue firmness and skin sensitivity, but this generally resolves by 12 weeks after the operation. No hand therapy is required unless you need some additional exercises to stretch the fingers after you have healed.

Posted: 12/21/2020

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Rheumatoid Arthritis And Hands

Rheumatoid arthritis often starts in smaller joints such as in the hand or wrist. One of the early signs of RA in the hands is aninability to form a complete fist.

It usually occurs in a symmetrical pattern, affecting both hands including the knuckle joints, middle finger joints and wrists. People withlong-standing RA or those diagnosed later in life may notice a deviation of their fingers to the side, away from the thumb.

Surrounding tendons can also become inflamed, affecting the ability to straighten fingers. People with RA are also more susceptible todeveloping carpal tunnel syndrome, a condition caused by pressure on nerves that run through the wrist, with symptoms of numbness, pins andneedles, and pain.

Finger Arthritis Treatment Options:

For early stage to moderate finger arthritis, non-surgical treatments may be recommended.

Non-surgical treatment options for finger arthritis include:

  • Hand therapy – Often performed by an occupational therapist, hand therapy can reduce pain and stiffness caused by finger arthritis
  • Medications – Your GP may prescribe medications to you. These can reduce the pain and the joint inflammation caused by the arthritis
  • Cortisone injections – This is an anti-inflammation medication that can be administered by injection
  • Splints – Splints help to support the fingers affected by arthritis and reduce joint stiffness

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The Little Finger Is Bent And Cannot Be Straightened

My mother is 51 years old, both of her pinky fingers are bent 1 finger segment and cannot be straightened. X-ray tests have been done but the results are normal , blood tests have been done and the immune results are normal and finally physiotherapy has been done for 14x but the results are still the same finger can not be straightened. In this case, does my mother need to have a CT scan / MRI scan? What specialist doctors can be recommended for what my mother experienced? thanks.

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How To Treat Osteoarthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis (Amavata)

The goals in treating osteoarthritis are to relieve pain and restore function. Brief rest either by changing activities or wearing a splint can help. Soft, snug sleeves can help support a joint when rigid splints are too restrictive. Heat can soothe the joints and help keep them mobile. It is important to keep as much finger motion and function as possible. Hand therapists can teach joint protection exercises and activity modification to help protect joints. Anti-inflammatory medication or a steroid injection into the joint can decrease pain, but neither cures osteoarthritis.

Surgery is considered when the non-surgical options above have not helped. In most cases, you will tell your doctor when you are ready for surgery. The goal is to restore as much function as possible and to minimize your pain. One type of surgery is joint fusion. The worn cartilage is removed and the bones on each side of the joint are fused together, which means that the joint will not move but it will not hurt. Another choice is joint reconstruction, where the rough joint surface is removed and either replaced with your own soft tissue or with an implant. The type of surgery depends on the joint involved, your anatomy, and your activities. Your hand surgeon can help you decide which type of surgery is the best for you.

This content is written, edited and updated by hand surgeon members of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand.Find a hand surgeon near you.

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Osteoarthritis Of The Hands

Get more information about the causes, symptoms and treatments of hand OA, which is very common and can be debilitating.

About half of all women and one-quarter of all men will experience the stiffness and pain of osteoarthritis of the hands by the time they are 85 years old. A degenerative disease that affects all the tissues of a joint, OA leads to the breakdown over time of the smooth, protective cartilage on the ends of bones, so bones rub together, causing pain. The 29 bones of your hands and wrists come together to form many small joints that can be affected by OA.

Symptoms Of Arthritis In Hands And Fingers

While not everyone with arthritis in the joints in hands will experience all of these symptoms and some people may not even have anysymptoms at all, below are some common symptoms for hand arthritis:

  • Joint pain. This is initially experienced as a dull, burning sensation after a particularly busy day. As arthritisadvances, the pain becomes sharper and more constant, even occurring at rest.
  • Joint stiffness. This is common in the morning but also occurs after a long day of work or activity involving the hands
  • Crepitus. This is a grinding, grating feeling or a crunchy sound in the hands or wrists on movement.
  • Weakness. It can begin to get difficult to grasp an object or maintain a strong grip or pinch.
  • Warmth or redness. It is common to feel warmth or redness where the joint, ligaments or tissues have become inflamed.
  • Swelling. Swollen joints in fingers, hands and thumbs are very common and can lead to a puffier appearance.
  • Loss of movement. Particularly as arthritis progresses, you may notice loss of movement in the affected joints.
  • Joint shape. You may notice changes in joint shape, or a slight turn in the direction of a finger or thumb.This is usually caused by uneven wearing of cartilage or weakness surrounding tissues or ligaments.
  • Knobbly or crooked fingers. Bone spurs can give a knobbly or crooked appearance to fingers and thumbs, and in some casescan also reduce the function of fingers or thumbs.

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What Is Finger Arthritis Treatment

Finger arthritis treatment is available at Circle Health to treat arthritis affecting the fingers. There are two main types of arthritis that affect the fingers: rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

Rheumatoid arthritis can cause inflammation in the finger joints, often making the finger knuckles stiff and painful to move. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of finger arthritis. It involves the cartilage between the finger joints to gradually wear away, causing pain and restricted movement.

What Are The Symptoms Of Numbness In The Left Hand

Osteoarthritis (Arthritis of Hands, Knees) | Causes, Risk Factors, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

Symptoms of numbness in the fingers of the left hand. Clinical manifestations of numbness of the fingers usually peak at night and morning. The main symptoms are: reduced sensitivity of some or all fingers tingling sensation in the fingers transient muscle weakness in the fingers burning sensation, crawling goosebumps on the skin.

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Malalignment Of One Or More Finger Joints

Over time, the destruction of bone and joint tissue may cause fingers and thumbs to become deformed. While the risk of hand deformities is significant, they are not inevitable.

A diagnosing physician will examine a patients hands, feet, and any other jointslarge or smallthat the patient reports as painful.

Read Are My Painful Joints Caused By Rheumatoid Arthritis or Something Else?

What Is Arthritis In Fingers

Arthritis in the fingers is a condition where the joints in your fingers are affected and become swollen and painful. Arthritis in itself can affect any part of your body with joints and cartilages. It may do so by breaking down the smooth lining at the end of the bones known as the cartilage or the tissues of joints or by causing inflammation. This leads to the bones becoming exposed, rubbing against each other, and wearing away . Since your hand has many joints, it can be prone to arthritis, and arthritis in the hands can progress to finger arthritis.

There are a few types of arthritis that can affect the hands and fingers, like:

  • Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis affects the wrist, the joint located at the base of the thumb, and the middle and top joints in the fingers. With osteoarthritis, you experience wear and tear of the cartilage which eventually leads the bones to rub against each other and get damaged. This progressive wearing down of the cartilage and bones may cause stiffness, deformities, and pain .

  • Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is an auto-immune disease in which the bodys natural immune system begins to attack its own healthy tissues, leading to inflammation in the lining of the joints. This causes a breakdown in the cartilage and eventually leads to the bones getting eroded. This chronic condition affects the small joints in the wrists, hands, and fingers symmetrically .

  • Psoriatic Arthritis
  • Gout

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How Is Arthritis In The Hand Treated

Treatment options depend on the type of arthritis, stage of arthritis, how many joints are affected, your age, activity level, the hand affected and other existing medical conditions.

Goals of treatment are to:

  • Improve mobility and function.
  • Increase your quality of life.
  • In the case of rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis, to slow the progression of the disease.

Treatment options include splinting/bracing, medications, injections, non-drug approaches and surgery.

Splinting/braces

Splits or braces support and protect the affected joint, reduce deformity, provide joint stability, lessen strain, and promote proper joint alignment. Your healthcare provider, occupational therapist or hand therapist will discuss splinting/bracing options, how and when to wear them and how long to wear them .

Medications

Steroid injections

Steroids reduce inflammation and relieve pain. Steroids are usually used if medications dont control inflammation or if the inflammation is limited to a few joints. Injections are administered directly into the affected joint. Because steroids can weaken tendons and ligaments, injections are repeated only a few times.

Other management strategies

A complete treatment plan for arthritis of the hand includes these additional approaches:

Surgery

If nonsurgical treatments no longer provide relief and the cartilage at the ends of your bones has worn away, surgery may be an option. There are several approaches:

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