Friday, January 27, 2023

What To Do When You Have An Arthritis Flare Up

How Long Do Ra Flares Last

Arthritis Flare Up

The length of time an RA flare lasts can vary widely, from a few hours to several days or weeks. If a flare does not improve after 7 days, it may be a good idea to contact a physician. The doctor may suggest adjusting the persons medication.

Before a RA flare begins, a person may experience fatigue or feel that something is not quite right.

During a flare, symptoms tend to increase until they reach their peak. As the peak passes, the symptoms will lessen and may completely disappear.

The frequency and severity of flares can vary widely between individuals. With treatment, a person may spend months or years in remission, while others may experience flares more frequently.

RA flares can be predictable or unpredictable. A flare will occur when something triggers an increase in disease activity, which means that levels of inflammation go up.

Predictable flares usually occur in response to one or more triggers.

Some flares have no apparent trigger, and a person may be unable to identify why it started. This can make them harder to avoid.

In 2017, a involving 274 people with RA who attended a clinic in Turkey found the following appeared to worsen their symptoms:

  • emotional or physical stress

Adjust And Ask For Help

Tell your family and friends that you’re having a flare. Let them know you’ll need help with some chores you ordinarily handle.

Adjust expectations of yourself. Rather than cook dinner for friends, invite them over for take-out pizza. Getting together is the point, not the food.

If possible, make a flare plan ahead of time with your supervisors and coworkers. Arrange to work fewer hours or from home, or take a few days off if you need to.

Managing An Arthritis Flare

An arthritis flare is an episode of increased pain, fatigue, joint stiffness, swelling and tenderness. These symptoms may lead to a loss of functioning and interfere with peoples mood, sleep quality, and ability to perform everyday activities. Depending on the type of arthritis you have, flares can be triggered by a variety of things such as overexertion, infection, stress, poor sleep, medication changes or for no apparent reason.

To minimise the impact and help you recover from an arthritis flare as quickly as possible, consider the following tips.

Plan Ahead

Plan ahead to make things easier for yourself when an unexpected flare occurs. At work, try to arrange for days off, change your daily work schedule, work fewer hours per week or work from home. Make a plan with supervisors and co-workers ahead of time so you can transition smoothly when a flare occurs. At home, let family members know which responsibilities will be shifted to them in order to keep things running smoothly, have ready-cooked meals in the freezer, get a cleaner/gardener for the short term or let things slide until you are feeling better. Also ask friends for help, sometimes you just need to ask!

Rest & Sleep

See below for our resources on Managing Fatigue and Tips for a Better Nights Sleep.

Hot & Cold Therapies

For more info on using hot and cold therapies, see our resources below.

Gentle Exercise
Assistive Devices
Pain Medication
Reduce Stress

See below for our resource on Managing Chronic Pain.

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Working With Your Doctor

You may not need to see your doctor every time you have a flare-up.

However, if pain and other symptoms last beyond a few days, you may want to make an appointment. Your doctor can investigate any symptoms that seem to be progressing, such as a reduction in flexibility.

Tracking flares through a journal or app can help you and your doctor to monitor the progression of your OA. The information you collect can help inform the decisions you make about treatment.

Your doctor may recommend imaging tests, such as an X-ray or MRI. These can help identify changes that might indicate whether youre experiencing a flare-up, long-term damage, or both.

If the results suggest new changes, your doctor will help you adjust your treatment plan to take these into account.

In time, flare-ups may become more frequent and symptoms can start to affect your mobility and quality of life. At this point, you may wish to consider joint replacement surgery.

Surgery is usually the last option for treating OA, but many people find it resolves recurring flare-ups and decreases the pain.

for OA and an OA flare-up usually involves a combination of over-the-counter or prescription medications and home remedies. Talk to your doctor about the options below.

Osteoarthritis Of The Spine

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Osteoarthritis is the most common form of spinal arthritis. It usually affects the lower back and develops through wear and tear. As the cartilage between the joints slowly breaks down, it leads to inflammation and pain. Because the pain is from mechanical damage, it is typically more noticeable when you bend or twist your back. Past back injuries may also contribute to the development of degenerative arthritis of the spine.

Osteoarthritis of the spine usually affects the facet joints between the vertebrae. It is also known as facet joint arthritis, facet joint syndrome and facet disease. In some cases, degeneration of the spinal discs may contribute to facet joint arthritis. As discs between the vertebrae become thinner, more pressure is transferred to the facet joints. This leads to more friction and more damage to the cartilage.

When these degenerative changes occur in the neck, this condition is called cervical spondylosis. Arthritis in the neck doesnt always cause pain, and many people have no noticeable symptoms.

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Get Enough Rest And Sleep

Getting a decent amount of rest and sleep is important for people with arthritis. We need to rest our bodies even more than the average, healthy human.

Don’t take this advice too farwe are not supposed to become sedentary in our lives. We are supposed to strike a balance between rest and activity that will help improve our overall health.

Disrupted sleep, especially on a regular basis, seems to increase pain and the risk of a flare up. This can be tough to get a handle on, because it’s a vicious cycle at times, with arthritis causing sleep disruption and sleep disruption making arthritis worse.

Balance Rest And Activity

At the height of your flare, you may need complete bed rest. Your body may not give you any choice. But try not to stay in bed for more than a day or two. Spending too much time lying on the bed or sofa will make you stiff and increase your pain.

Once you start to feel a bit better, get up, stretch, go for a walk, and continue with as many of your usual activities as possible. You may need to cut back on your work, exercise, and social activities, but don’t abandon them. Take breaks when you get tired.

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Knowing How To Soothe The Pain

The reality of an ensuing osteoarthritis flare-up always fills me with anxiety and dread, but it also makes me get everything that provides me pain relief in order to make sure I have them on-hand. Whether this is medication, a stretching plan or specific osteoarthritis exercise, heat pads, or any other item, do not endure a flare up without them!

My choice of pain relievers helps to keep me functioning during my worst flare-ups. You need to be able to identify what provides you the best pain relief and use them. On the other hand, be mindful of not overusing any of these pain relievers and make sure your doctor is aware you use them.

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Knowing When To Seek Medical Help

Rheumatoid Arthritis Flares: How to reduce them and tips to manage them

Sometimes you just have to know when enough is enough and to seek medical help for an OA flare-up. Although chronic pain and osteoarthritis can be difficult to properly treat, there is a diverse array of modalities a trained physician can use to help relieve your flare up.

This might sound like wishful thinking, but I am a testament to medicine helping to relieve my osteoarthritis flare-ups. Before I was treated with radiofrequency ablation in my spine, I would get flare ups about once a month that lasted about three to seven days.

I had simply accepted it as a reality of life that I would experience for the foreseeable future. However, after a devastating flare-up, I went to a physician in desperation and the rest is history.

I still get flare-ups now but they are few and far between. While I cant promise everyone will get adequate pain relief after seeing a physician, but it is definitely an option worth pursuing.

I have struggled with the flare-ups of OA for about five years now. Although it is not a perfect system, these methods have helped me cope with the pain and continue to function as normal as possible.

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What About The Mediterranean Diet

Studies have suggested that the Mediterranean diet can reduce the inflammation that contributes to the symptoms of osteoarthritis.

As well as helping to reduce the pain associated with osteoarthritis, eating a Mediterranean-style diet offers many other health benefits, including weight loss.

Following a Mediterranean diet may also reduce the risk of:

When someone is living with osteoarthritis, their body is in an inflammatory state.

While foods with anti-inflammatory properties may reduce symptoms, some foods contain substances that actively contribute to this inflammation. It is best to avoid or restrict these dietary choices.

The types of food to avoid are those that include the following:

How Psoriatic Arthritis Flares Are Diagnosed

Because PsA flares dont have a set definition, the diagnosis is made in large part through communication with your doctor. The first thing we do is we look at the history: whats been happening before the flare, Dr. Husni says. We want to know what the triggers are for your disease and we want patients to see the connection.

A skin flare is a bit easier to identify, and a diagnosis would be made with a rheumatologist and dermatologist. We work very closely with the dermatologist its important that they are involved in the treatment decision, Dr. Husni says.

PsA flare-ups can be so hard to pin down that both professionals we talked to suggested keeping a brief diary of your symptoms to help your doctor diagnose when they are happening, and why.

I recommend that people keep a symptom diary over time so that they can keep track of the conditions that might have preceded their flares in their lifetime, so that they can respond more proactively in the future, Crow says. Unfortunately often its most clear in retrospect. You can use our ArthritisPower app to track your symptoms and disease activity and share your results with your doctor.

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How Psoriatic Arthritis Is Diagnosed

The diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis can best be made by a rheumatologist who is familiar with the many subtleties of this disease. X-rays can sometimes assist in the diagnosis. A careful history and a detailed physical examination with particular attention to the joints, skin, and nails are most important. Once the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis is made, your rheumatologist will devise a treatment strategy for you.

How Is Jia Treated

Pin on Arthritis Info

When JIA is diagnosed early and treated appropriately, it can usually be managed effectively. There’s no cure, but there’s a lot doctors can do to ease the symptoms of JIA and prevent or limit damage to joints.

For some people, taking medications like ibuprofen or naproxen can help reduce inflammation. Some patients need to take a weekly medication called methotrexate. Newer medications such as etanercept, adalimumab, abatacept, and tocilizumab can keep the immune system in check and control the disease far better than was possible a few years ago. For arthritis flare-ups, doctors may also use medicines called corticosteroids , but they try to limit these to avoid side effects.

Physical therapy exercises that improve flexibility and the use of heat can help people with JIA control symptoms. It’s rare that joints get damaged in a person’s teens, but surgery can repair damaged joints if needed.

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Symptoms Of Severe Osteoarthritis

If you suffer from severe osteoarthritis, pain may take place with motion and activity, along with when you take rest. Your motion range of the affected joints will remain limited if you suffer from severe osteoarthritis. Besides, you may experience joint locking or joint buckling problems. Even though, locking or buckling joints seem to be nuisances, they lead to severe consequences, especially when your joint locks or buckles. Along with this, you may experience a few of the additional symptoms, such as-

  • Stiffness while walking

Joint Replacement For Osteoarthritis

Prior to considering joint replacement surgery it is important that you have tried to optimise the management of your arthritis with none surgical treatment methods. the short video below discusses the importance of this.

Whether to go ahead with a joint replacement is a big decision. The NHS has developed a tool to help you explore the issues around this decision. This can be accessed here:

If you would like to discuss hip replacement with us please discuss an MSK referral with your GP.To fill in an Oxford knee Score to facilitate your assessment click here.

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Take Control Of Your Joint Care

Knowing that an osteoarthritis flare-up is manageable is the first step to minimizing joint pain and boosting joint health. The damage done may be irreversible, but there is much that you can do to prevent the flare-ups that can make things worse.

Of course, there are a number of medications designed to ease pain and swelling, but the best approach to managing flare-ups is with lifestyle changes.

Medications For Ra Flare

The Rheumatoid Arthritis Flare Kit

One of the best things you can do to keep your RA under control is to take your medications as prescribed. Keep in mind, however, that medications like disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are not cures they help keep RA in a low state of disease activity or in remission.

You may need other medications, including steroids and over-the-counter pain relievers, to help manage symptoms during a flare. However, your doctor may also choose to increase the dose of your usual medications. I can go for a long time without a bad flare, and sometimes they go away on their own, wrote one myRAteam member. Other times, the flare persists and is really painful. At those times, I speak to my rheumatologist, who often increases my dose of methotrexate for a while.

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Knee Arthritis Signs & Symptoms

Although osteoarthritis is a progressive disease, the signs and symptoms of the condition rarely get worse in a linear fashion. Often people in their thirties or forties will over do it one weekend, either in sport or in the garden, and they will experience a flare up from the degenerate joint. This flare up may last for 48 hours and usually consists of stiffness , pain and swelling of the affected joint. The knee may, but not always, make a creaking or grating sound as the process progresses.

A substantial time period may pass before there is another flare up, but each flare up will get progressively more intense. Also, as time goes by and more stress is put on the affected joint, the time interval between flare ups will decrease to the point where, eventually, the person will have pain even at rest.

As the disease progresses the symptoms that start off being triggered by over activity, become triggered by immobility. Whereas, in the early stages, rest is essential during a flare up period, disuse in the later stages will exacerbate the problem. This is because the dynamic stability provided by the muscles surrounding the joint is lost if there is muscle wasting due to inactivity. This puts even more strain on the ligaments and ultimately the joint surfaces themselves producing more pain. In the later stages, if there is pain at rest and during the night, as well as problems with mobility, then joint replacement surgery is appropriate.

What Causes Gout To Flare Up

Gout is a complex form of arthritis that can flare up suddenly and severely. It occurs as a result of having high levels of uric acid, which makes it easier for urate crystals to form. These sharp crystals can deposit in your joints, causing inflammation, swelling and pain.

“The most common trigger of gout is eating purine-rich foods, since high levels of purines can increase the amount of uric acid in your bloodstream,” explains Dr. Alam.

Gout-sufferers can help avoid flare-ups by avoiding foods rich in purines, including:

  • Red meat
  • Certain types of seafood, including tuna, scallops and trout
  • Alcohol, particularly beer
  • Fruit juices and other beverages that contain fructose

“Similar to rheumatoid arthritis, a flare-up of gout can be alleviated by using a cold compress on the affected joint, which helps reduce the inflammation that’s causing your pain, swelling and stiffness,” says Dr. Alam.

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Stay Away From Foods That Make You Feel Worse

The effect of diet on arthritis has been disputed for years. Some claim there is no direct effect, while others claim certain foods increase inflammation and make arthritis symptoms worse. This is likely the most individual tip of all those listed.

If you are aware that certain foods make your arthritis feel worse, steer clear. This will not be the case for every person with arthritis, but if it does apply to you, don’t eat foods that trigger inflammation.

How Does Osteoarthritis Evolve

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It is likely that in the early stages, damage to the cartilage might be completely reversible, thanks to the healing capacities of the lesions, especially in the very young.

Once these lesions become significantly established and especially after a certain age, it will be difficult for the body to repair these lesions, osteoarthritis will then evolve to a worsening stage which means that there will be an increasingly greater loss of cartilage.

This loss of cartilage evolves in 3 clinical forms:

  • a slow and progressive deterioration over several decades
  • or, conversely, a very rapid deterioration leading to loss of cartilage in 12 to 24 months (this is known as rapidly destructive osteoarthritis
  • or an intermediate form in which the evolution is punctuated by periods in which the osteoarthritis evolves very quickly and other periods, on the contrary, when the osteoarthritis does not evolve or evolves very little.

Osteoarthritis does not evolve uniformly, it is unpredictable. It can remain silent for a long time and not manifest itself even though the joint looks very damaged on the X-ray. But it can also worsen rapidly over several weeks or months at a stage when the X-rays are almost normal. It is this imbalance between pain and radiographic osteoarthritis which makes it difficult to understand and evaluate.

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