Thursday, September 29, 2022

What Kind Of Pain Is Arthritis

Symptoms Of Arthritis Of The Spine

Inflammatory Arthritis: Types and Treatments

Spinal arthritis causes stiffness and low back pain. The stiffness is worst upon waking up in the morning, tends to ease with activity, then worsens toward the end of the day. Presumably, this is because fluid has built up in the joint due to inactivity overnight, which causes more swelling.

The low back pain due to facet joint arthritis has a typical pattern:

  • The pain is mostly more than 80% in the back, runs into the buttocks, and often really feels like its in the hip.
  • As it gets even worse people often report burning on the outer aspect of the thigh, and sometimes pain down the leg.

What Is A Joint And How Does It Work

A joint is where two or more bones meet, such as in the fingers, knees, and shoulders. Joints hold bones in place and allow them to move freely within limits.

Most of the joints in our body are surrounded by a strong capsule. The capsule is filled with a thick fluid that helps to lubricate the joint. These capsules hold our bones in place. They do this with the help of ligaments. These are a bit like very strong elastic bands.

The ends of the bones within a joint are lined with cartilage. This is a smooth but tough layer of tissue that allows bones to glide over one another as you move.

If we want to move a bone, our brain gives a signal to the muscle, which then pulls a tendon, and this is attached to the bone. Muscles therefore have an important role in supporting a joint.

Can Arthritis Cause Numbness

Numbness is often a symptom of nerve involvement. For instance, numbness in the arm may be related to nerve irritation in the neck. In such a situation, turning or bending the head to the involved side may increase the symptoms. For example, a pinched nerve in the right side of the neck may cause numbness in the arm and hand when a person attempts to look back over the right shoulder. If nerve irritation becomes more severe, the arm and hand may become weak. A physical examination X-rays and an MRI of the neck and electrodiagnostic tests may be useful in establishing the diagnosis.

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Expert Q& A: Just Dealing With Chronic Pain

Why it√Ęs important to get proper treatment for chronic pain.

Q: With both fibromyalgia and osteoarthritis, I have constant pain. Even with treatment, it never goes away completely. Ive just been dealing with it. Is that OK?

Chronic pain is not a problem you should just put up with in fact, you should be dealing with chronic pain in ways that are effective. This is important because an increasing number of studies show serious consequences of having chronic pain. It may cause damage to certain areas of the brain, just as chronic stress does. Chronic pain also may lead to psychological problems, such as depression social problems, such as isolation or decreased earning potential and functional problems, such as decreased activity or disability.

Medications can also be helpful. For moderate-to-severe knee osteoarthritis , the supplement glucosamine may provide some relief, as may the right combination of analgesics or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs . There are three drugs specifically approved for use in fibromyalgia, as well as many drugs that have been shown to be effective but are not specifically approved.

Tell your doctor that the treatments you tried previously are not resolving your chronic pain, and then work with him to find the right combination of treatments for you. It may take some time, but the result will be worth the effort.

Arthritis Pain Or Muscle Pain: How To Tell The Difference

10 Symptoms of Osteoarthritis You Might Be Ignoring

As a Good Samaritan, you helped your neighbour who was moving his couch up to the third floor. The result: your back is throbbing with pain.

Most active people sometimes come up against a few obstacles that can temporarily affect their ability to move and require taking pain medication. A wrong move, a fall or an injury are a few events that can be a source of muscle pain or inflammation. When these events occur, it seems a lot of us line up to read the dizzying selection of product packages on display in the analgesics and anti-inflammatory section at the pharmacy. Faced with such a wide choice of products, it is normal to get confused, especially when we are not exactly certain just what kind of pain is bothering us.

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What Is The Best Treatment For Arthritis

Painkillers, along with physical therapy, is usually considered the best treatment for arthritis in the early stages. However, if the patient is unable to continue their daily activities, then the surgical option is recommended at the particular painful joint to give relief to the patient.

  • Physical therapy: Physical therapists can work with patients on exercises to reduce pain and improve their range of motion. Patients with arthritis have a hard time performing physical activities, but exercise can relieve arthritis pain and lessen joint damage.
  • Exercise can also help to lose weight that will put less stress on the joints. Exercises such as stretching, muscle strengthening and aerobics can help patients to stay fit. It also increases flexibility, range of motion and lubrication in their joints.
  • Exercises involving lifting weights can build muscle strength, which can help a person to manage daily activities.
  • Exercises also strengthen the heart and lungs and can reduce fatigue besides increasing the patients stamina.
  • Typical aerobic exercises such as walking, running, riding a bicycle, swimming, or using a treadmill can cut down calories. Walking and water aerobics are considered the best exercises for arthritis patients.
  • Natural remedies: Natural remedies are usually considered by the patient because they believe them to have limited side effects. Some herbs and supplements may relieve arthritis.
  • Does Arthritis Hurt All The Time

    Overview. Many people who have arthritis or a related disease may be living with chronic pain. Pain is chronic when it lasts three to six months or longer, but arthritis pain can last a lifetime. It may be constant, or it may come and go.

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    Osteoarthritis is likely if:

    • You are over 45
    • You have pain and stiffness in one or more of the joints commonly affected by osteoarthritis
    • The stiffness in the morning lasts for less than 30 minutes
    • The stiffness and pain are worse with exercise or using the joints, for example after gardening

    Often no special tests are needed to diagnose osteoarthritis, but sometimes blood tests may be taken to make sure that nothing else is wrong and sometimes X-rays can help confirm the diagnosis. Sometimes MRI scans are used but these are usually not necessary. X-rays of the neck and low back are not useful in diagnosing osteoarthritis because they often show changes that happen normally with age and many people with these changes have no pain.

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    Other Conditions And Joint Pain

    Other forms of arthritis, and other conditions, can also cause joint pain. Examples include:

    • fibromyalgia syndrome, a condition in which your brain processes pain in your muscles and joints in a way that amplifies your perception of the pain
    • scleroderma, an autoimmune condition in which inflammation and hardening in your skin connective tissues can lead to organ damage and joint pain

    Explain The Pain Is It Osteoarthritis Or Rheumatoid Arthritis

    What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    If opening jars becomes more difficult because of painful hands, or if climbing stairs produces pain in your knees, “arthritis” is often the first thing that comes to mind. The two most common forms of arthritisosteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritiscan cause similar aches and pains, but there are a few key differences between them. For example:

    Onset. Osteoarthritis occurs when cartilage wears away. Pain occurs when bone rubs against bone. This type of arthritis pain tends to develop gradually and intermittently over several months or years.

    Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis affecting 27 million Americans. Many people believe it’s a crippling and inevitable part of growing old. But things are changing. Treatments are better, and plenty of people age well without much arthritis. If you have osteoarthritis, you can take steps to protect your joints, reduce discomfort, and improve mobility all of which are detailed in this report. If you don’t have osteoarthritis, the report offers strategies for preventing it.

    Rheumatoid arthritis, on the other hand, is an inflammatory condition in which your immune system attacks the tissues in your joints. It causes pain and stiffness that worsen over several weeks or a few months. And joint pain isn’t always the first sign of rheumatoid arthritissometimes it begins with “flu-like” symptoms of fatigue, fever, weakness, and minor joint aches.

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    What Is The Patient’s Role In Treating Or Managing Arthritis

    The patient is the most important member of the health care team.

    The patient plays an important role in his or her medical care. The patient can contribute to the success of a treatment plan by:

    • learning about arthritis
    • reporting progress and setbacks to health team
    • keeping a positive attitude
    • developing relationships with the rest of the health care team

    Keeping a positive attitude, though sometimes difficult, is an important ingredient in overcoming arthritis. Asking questions and finding out as much as you can about of arthritis and its treatment is important. So talk over your concerns with your doctor. If you still need more information , ask the nurse, physical therapist, social worker, occupational therapist to help you find answers to your questions.

    What Causes Arthritis

    Different types of arthritis have different causes. For instance, gout is the result of too much uric acid in your body. But for other types of arthritis, the exact cause is unknown. You may develop arthritis if you:

    • Have a family history of arthritis.
    • Have a job or play a sport that puts repeated stress on your joints.
    • Have certain autoimmune diseases or viral infections.

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    Should I See A Doctor

    Its common to have aches and pains in your muscles and joints from time to time. This may especially be true if you take part in unusual or strenuous physical activities.

    So, how can you tell the difference between the early signs of arthritis and normal pain and stiffness? And, how do you know when you should see a doctor about your symptoms?

    If you have swelling or stiffness that you cant explain and that doesn’t go away in a few days, or if it becomes painful to touch your joints, you should see a doctor. The earlier you get a diagnosis and start the right type of treatment, the better the outcome will be.

    Here are some other things to think about that might help you decide whether you need to see a doctor:

    Soft Tissue Musculoskeletal Pain

    Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Soft tissue musculoskeletal pain is felt in tissues other than the joints and bones. The pain often affects a part of the body following injury or overuse, such as tennis elbow, and originates from the muscles or soft tissues supporting the joints.

    Pain that is more widespread and associated with other symptoms may indicate fibromyalgia.

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    What You Need To Know

    • There are several types of hip arthritis, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and post-traumatic arthritis.
    • The causes of hip arthritis vary depending on the type. The most common cause is age-related wear and tear in the hip joint.
    • Symptoms of hip arthritis may include pain in or near the hip joint, stiffness, audible clicking sounds when moving the hip, and weakness.
    • While hip arthritis is usually a chronic condition, there are treatments to help ease the symptoms and reduce further damage. If your quality of life suffers, surgery such as hip replacement can provide long-term relief.

    Inflammatory Arthritis Vs Osteoarthritis

    Arthritis actually describes over 100 different conditions that affect joints and the surrounding tissue. They fall into two main categories: inflammatory arthritis and osteoarthritis .

    Inflammatory arthritis is a systemic disease in which the mechanisms that normally protect your body attack your own joints and tissues instead. The most well-known example is rheumatoid arthritis , which tends to be symmetrical, meaning you’ll have problems in the same joints on both sides of your body, like both wrists or both knees.

    The second type of arthritis and the most common form is osteoarthritis. A degenerative disorder, it’s caused by trauma or age-related wear and tear on your joints over time. OA is most likely to affect weight-bearing joints such as the knees, hip, lower spine or big toe, but it can also cause pain and stiffness in your thumb or finger joints.

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    How Does Rheumatoid Arthritis Cause Back Pain

    In terms of spine involvement, RA primarily affects the cervical spine, which is located at the top of the spinal cord and forms your neck. While it is possible for the middle or lower back to be affected, this is considered rare.

    If a patient with established RA comes to me with pain in the mid or lower back, Im less likely to think their symptoms are directly related to RA, Dr. Bolster says.

    Heres the reason that the cervical spine is more commonly affected: In RA, the immune system attacks the synovium, the thin membrane that lines your joints its the main site of the inflammatory process in rheumatoid arthritis.

    The spines top two vertebrae, C1 and C2, are synovial-lined joints, and are therefore subject to developing the inflammation and joint erosion you experience in your peripheral joints.

    Its unclear how many people with RA have cervical spine involvement. It typically develops in the later stages of RA, but Dr. Bolster says it has been reported earlier.

    My back pain started pretty quickly, within the first year of my RA diagnosis, says CreakyJoints community member Lisa Powell, who experiences both cervical and lumbar back pain. My doctor hasnt totally ruled out that osteoarthritis might be the cause of the damage to my lower back, but the pain there seems very tied to my RA symptoms. It gets worse when my RA is flaring or isnt well controlled.

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    How Can You Live With Arthritis In Your Back Spinal Arthritis Treatment

    Treating Back Pain Caused by Arthritis
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  • Arthritis can affect any joint in your body, including your spine. Arthritis in the back can be extremely painful and in some cases debilitating. Inflammation and stiffness can make it difficult to walk, stand, or even sit.

    While living with spinal arthritis can be very difficult, there are effective ways to manage and deal with the condition.

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    Who Gets Arthritis In Their Hands

    You are more likely to get arthritis in your hands if:

    • Youre older. Osteoarthritis is commonly seen after age 50. Rheumatoid arthritis typically first appears between the age of 35 and 50.
    • Youre a woman.
    • Youre white.
    • Youre overweight.
    • Youve had previous injuries to your hand. If youve dislocated or broken any joints in your hands or fingers, you are more likely to develop arthritis.
    • You’ve inherited genes that cause the development of arthritis.

    Not All Joint Pain Is Arthritis

    As a rheumatologist, Im becoming an expert in evaluating all types of joint pain. My adult patients are wonderful at describing how their joints feel: burning, stabbing, pressure, stiffness, crushing, aching, throbbing. Children use more creative language: the joint feels like ice cream, like aliens are poking at them with needles from the inside, like bugs are crawling over them.

    Pain in a joint is one of the most common reasons why patients are referred to a rheumatologist, often with the suspicion that the pain is due to arthritis. Although there are many causes of joint pain, one simple question can help to differentiate between arthritis and most of the other conditions.

    Arthritis is a term that refers to inflammation of a joint. There are two basic types of arthritis: inflammatory arthritis and osteoarthritis. Its easy to see inflammatory arthritis: it causes joint swelling, warmth, redness, and pain. Osteoarthritis, on the other hand, does not cause much joint inflammation and usually only presents pain.

    So how is one to tell the difference between all of the entities that cause joint pain? Just ask this question: when do your symptoms occur?

    Take-home points:

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    Rheumatoid Arthritis Vs Osteoarthritis

    Many people confuse rheumatoid arthritis with osteoarthritis due to their similar symptoms, but the two diseases are caused by different factors.

    What is Osteoarthritis?

    Whereas rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that causes joint malfunction due to inflammation, osteoarthritis is a mechanical disease brought on by the destruction of joints through wear and tear.

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, with approximately 27 million Americans over the age of 25 having been diagnosed with it. Osteoarthritis is also most commonly seen in people middle-aged to elderly and is the top cause of disability in those age groups, though it can also appear in younger people who have sustained joint injuries.

    With osteoarthritis, the cartilage, joint lining, ligaments, and bone are all affected by deterioration and inflammation. When the cartilage begins to break down due to stress or changes in the body, the surrounding bones slowly get bigger and begin to fail.

    Osteoarthritis is a slowly progressing disease and occurs in the joints of the hand, spine, hips, knees, and toes. Furthermore, risk factors of this disease most often stem from lifestyle or biological causes, such as:

    • Obesity

    Osteoarthritis sometimes occurs alongside rheumatoid arthritis or other disease, such as gout.

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