Thursday, September 29, 2022

What Is The Difference Between Plaque Psoriasis And Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic Arthritis And Psoriasis Are Both Autoimmune Conditions

Difference Between Eczema And Psoriasis, Tea Tree Oil Psoriasis, Psoriasis On The Face

Both conditions happen when your autoimmune system mistakenly attacks healthy cells in your body, causing inflammation. With psoriasis, new skin cells grow too quickly and build up, resulting in thick, scaly rashes that can make it painful to move, according to the Cleveland Clinic. People with psoriatic arthritis also have inflammation, but their symptoms generally result in stiff, painful joints, and swollen skin surrounding the joints, according to the Mayo Clinic.

The exact causes of autoimmune diseases are not clear. Some experts theorize that injuries might trigger psoriatic arthritis and that infections could trigger psoriasis, according to John Hopkins University. Doctors commonly suspect that genetics may determine whether someone is susceptible to autoimmune disorders, but the specifics explaining how or why are up in the air.

Both conditions are lifelong diseases that can alternate between periods of remission where you have very few symptoms and flares in which your symptoms are worse.

Is There A Cure For Psoriasis

There is no cure at the moment. However, as a consequence of current research, our understanding about what happens in psoriasis is growing and new drugs are being developed. In the meantime, there are a number of treatments that are effective in keeping psoriasis under control.

The art of treating psoriasis is finding the best form of treatment for each individual. There is no single solution that is right for everyone.

Are Treatment Plans All That Different

Despite presenting very differently, there are many of the same treatment options for PsO and PsA, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and biologic drugs like Enbrel , Cosentyx , and Humira . There are, however, a few variances. For instance, as Dr. Friedman explains, unlike psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis typically doesnt respond to topical creams, as it primarily affects the joints, and creams are unable to effectively penetrate the dermis and reach the nerves underneath.

PsA needs to be treated with systemic therapies, such as biologics, for which we have many, Dr. Friedman says. But there are a good number of treatments approved for both plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Biologic drugs, for example, work for both PsA and PsO by blocking certain cells or proteins in our immune systemsuch as the T-cell or the tumor necrosis factor-alpha proteinthat largely contribute to the development of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

Dr. Finney adds that because joint changes associated with PsA can be permanent, prompt systemic treatment is highly warranted if someone does notice joint symptoms. Below, find a few systemic treatments for PsA and how they work.

Read Also: What Is The Best Cream For Rheumatoid Arthritis

Is Psoriasis The Same As Eczema

Psoriasis and eczema are two different skin conditions. They differ in where the disease appears on the body, how much it itches and how it looks. Eczema tends to appear more often behind the knees and inside the elbows. Eczema also causes more intense itching than psoriasis. Many people, especially children, can get both eczema and psoriasis.

How Are Psoriasis And Psoriatic Arthritis Connected

Psoriatic vs. rheumatoid arthritis: What is the difference ...

You may have heard that psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis are connected, but might not understand how. Although the conditions share a similar name, they can have some very different symptoms and treatments. People with psoriasis are at a greater risk of developing psoriatic arthritis, and sometimes people with psoriatic arthritis develop psoriasis later on, meaning its helpful to have an understanding of both conditions if you are diagnosed with one, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Untangling the nuances between these two conditions can be a bit complicated. Thats why we spoke with experts about the important things you should know about psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis, including how the two are linked.

Also Check: Is Monggo Beans Bad For Arthritis

How Is Each Treated

Eczema treatment depends on how severe it is. For mild to moderate cases, youâll use a topical corticosteroid to control inflammation, and youâll use an emollient on your skin. This type of moisturizer has an oil or cream base, not a water base, like lotion, which could dry your skin out more.

If you have moderate to severe eczema, you may need to try a medicine that affects your immune system like , methotrexate, azathioprine, or cyclosporine. If nothing else works, your doctor may prescribe a biologic drug called dupilumab . You might also try light therapy using ultraviolet light.

Psoriasis treatment is either systemic, which means it affects your entire body, or topical, which goes on your skin. If your disease is limited, or mild, you may be able to control it with topical corticosteroids and emollients.

Light therapy paired with methotrexate, cyclosporine, acretin, or a biologic is also an option for more severe cases. Or you could use just a biologic drug, which includes:

Summary Plaque Psoriasis Vs Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a chronic multisystem disease with skin and joint manifestations. Plaque psoriasis is the commonest form of psoriasis which is characterized by the appearance of reddish well-demarcated plaques with silver scales usually on the extensor surface of the knees and elbows. Accordingly plaque psoriasis is one manifestation of the broad spectrum of dermatological and systemic manifestations which are identified as psoriasis. This can be identified as the difference between plaque psoriasis and psoriasis.

Recommended Reading: Does Epsom Salt Help Arthritis

What Is Erythrodermic Psoriasis

Erythrodermic psoriasis is a rare form of psoriasis associated with extreme inflammation, itching and pain that affects most of the body. Other symptoms include large sheets of shedding skin , an increase in heart rate, swelling due to fluid retention and significant changes in your body temperature. Its important to seek immediate medical attention if you’re experiencing a flare-up of erythrodermic psoriasis as it can lead to pneumonia or heart failure if left untreated.6

Key Difference Plaque Psoriasis Vs Psoriasis

Psoriasis – Symptoms, Tips, and Treatment | The Best Psoriasis Treatment in Delhi | Dr Rohit Batra

Psoriasis is one of the most common dermatological problems that can have adverse effects on both social and mental well-being of the patient. It is an autoimmune condition whose pathogenesis is triggered by different intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Psoriasis can be defined as a chronic multisystem disease with skin and joint manifestations. There are different forms of psoriasis including guttate psoriasis, pustular psoriasis, etc. Out of them, plaque psoriasis is the commonest form of psoriasis which is characterized by the appearance of reddish well-demarcated plaques with silver scales usually on the extensor surface of the knees and elbows. So plaque psoriasis is one element of psoriasis which can have various other clinical manifestations. This is the key difference between Plaque Psoriasis and Psoriasis.

Also Check: Where To Buy Imak Arthritis Gloves

Are There Complications Of Psoriasis

In some people, psoriasis causes more than itchiness and red skin. It can lead to swollen joints and arthritis. If you have psoriasis, you may be at higher risk of:

  • Use medicated shampoo for scales on your scalp.

Other steps you should take to stay as healthy as possible:

  • Talk to your healthcare provider about lowering your risk for related conditions, such as heart disease, depression and diabetes.
  • Lower your stress with meditation, exercise or seeing a mental health professional.

What Is Psoriasis And Psoriatic Arthritis

If youve ever had dry, cracked heels and a very itchy, allergic skin reaction at the same time, youd probably be able to better understand what it feels like to have psoriasis .

As unlikely a combination as this may seem the symptoms and irritations of psoriatic disease are not just skin deep. Psoriatic disease hits our whole body and leaves us with psychological baggage.

Depending on where your symptoms appear, sudden onset of psoriasis mostly in stressful times can be embarrassing in public.

Were brought up to feel skin conditions are gross and embarrassing so they may go undiagnosed for years.Breaking the stigma of psoriatic disease is important for research purposes.

The more we know about individual symptoms and triggers of this debilitating condition, the more we can study, treat, and perhaps even cure psoriatic disease one day.

DID YOU KNOW?

Don’t Miss: How Do You Permanently Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis

What Causes Psoriasis And Psoriatic Arthritis

The symptoms of both psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis arise when the bodys immune system malfunctions, leading to inflammation.

In psoriasis, the faulty reaction causes skin cells to grow too fast, promoting a buildup of skin cells on the surface. These cells appear as a scaly rash.

In psoriatic arthritis, the inflammation affects the joints. Permanent damage can result if the person does not seek treatment.

Doctors do not yet know the exact causes of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. However, they do know that genetics contribute to both conditions.

An estimated 1 out of 3 people with psoriasis say that they have a family member with psoriasis. Also, around 40 percent of people with psoriatic arthritis have a family member with psoriatic disease.

Still, many people have genes for psoriatic disease and never develop it. To develop psoriatic disease, a person must have the specific genes for it, as well as a trigger that activates it.

Possible triggers for psoriatic disease include:

  • an infection, such as strep throat or a cold
  • use of tobacco or smoking
  • heavy alcohol use

These triggers may bring on psoriasis, and they can also cause flares. Flares are cycles during which symptoms become worse. Triggers vary from person to person and may change over time.

Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis symptoms often come and go in cycles. They may get worse during a flare and then improve. Symptoms may also move around, affecting different areas of the body at different times.

Can Psoriasis Be Treated

What are The Difference between Eczema and Psoriasis ...

Yes, there are many forms of treatment for psoriasis, which range from those you apply to the skin to tablets, and more recently injectable therapies, See Treatments for Psoriasis.

Many people who have psoriasis find that the sun and artificial ultraviolet light helps to improve their skins appearance. For some the change is dramatic. Be aware that exposure to the sun and artificial UV therapy can cause damage to the skin. See Psoriasis and the sun and Psoriasis and phototherapy

For some people, talking therapies such as cognitive behaviour therapy can also help them understand the psychological impact of psoriasis and provide a safe therapy which may help them cope with psoriasis. See our free online CBT programme

Your general practitioner or dermatologist will be best placed to advise you and keep you informed of all current and new treatments available and to recommend the best treatment programme for you personally.

Remember: Your treatment can only be as good as you allow it to be – that means if the treatment takes six weeks, you have to follow it as instructed for six weeks and no ducking out! Adherence to treatment instructions is an essential part of managing your psoriasis.

Read Also: What’s Better For Arthritis Heat Or Ice

At What Age Do They Start

Eczema usually starts in babies or young children. Often, symptoms improve when a kid becomes a grown-up.

It’s less common, but possible, to get it as an adult. When that happens, it’s usually because you have another condition like thyroid disease, hormone changes, or stress.

Psoriasis, on the other hand, usually shows up between ages 15 and 35. But you can get it at other ages too. It’s rare for a baby to have it.

What Causes Psoriasis Outbreaks

Psoriasis outbreaks differ from person to person. No one knows exactly what causes flare-ups. Common psoriasis triggers may include:

  • Skin injury .
  • Streptococcal or other infection that affects the immune system.
  • Certain prescription medications .
  • Cold weather, when people have less exposure to sunlight and humidity and more to hot, dry indoor air.

Recommended Reading: What Helps With Arthritis In Back

Up To 30 Percent Of People With Psoriasis Will Go On To Develop Psa And 85 Percent Of People With Psa Also Have Skin Psoriasis

Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are distinct conditions, but they are connected. In fact, data show that up to 30 percent of people with psoriasis will go on to develop PsA and 85 percent of people with PsA also have skin psoriasis.

Although people can be diagnosed with PsA without having any skin involvement, most often they will have a family member with skin psoriasis, says Rebecca Haberman, MD, a rheumatologist at NYU Langone Health in New York City.

Psoriasis is an inflammatory condition of the skin, while psoriatic arthritis also includes inflammation of the joints and entheses , .

Read on to find out the different symptoms of psoriasis vs. PsA, how they are diagnosed and treated, and what you need know about the link between these health conditions.

How Do Psoriasis And Psa Overlap

Psoriasis or eczema

For every 10 patients who walk in the door with psoriasis, about three or four of them will eventually get PsA, says Elaine Husni, MD, MPH, vice chair of the department of rheumatic & immunologic diseases at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. Most cases almost always start with the skin condition and then within seven to 10 years later, joint pain symptoms start to develop.

However, skin and joint symptoms can develop at the same time and, more rarely, joint symptoms can appear before skin involvement, says Dr. Haberman. While estimates vary, one study showed that up to 3 percent of patients developed joint disease before skin disease, she notes.

In some cases, there may have been skin involvement that went unnoticed or undiagnosed. For example, psoriasis can be sneaky and show up in hidden or private areas like the scalp, intergluteal cleft , belly button, and inside the ear, explains Dr. Husni. Since people dont really examine their scalp or buttocks very often, small psoriasis patches can get missed and delay diagnosis, she says.

Adds Dr. Haberman: You might have a small fleck in your scalp that you just think of as dandruff that is actually psoriasis.

Whats more, people with psoriasis in some of these hidden areas may actually be more prone to PsA. Studies have shown that you may be at higher risk of developing PsA if you have scalp, nail, or inverse psoriasis, says Dr. Haberman.

Recommended Reading: Can Rheumatoid Arthritis Affect Your Lungs

Which Came First: Psa Or Pso

Can you have psoriatic arthritis without having psoriasis? Lets get this one out of the way first, shall we? The short answer is yes, yes you can have psoriatic arthritis and not psoriasishowever, if you have PsA, you will likely have a history of psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis somewhere in your family line. It is very rare for a patient to develop PsA prior to having psoriasis noticeable on the skin, but it has been reported, says Robert Finney, M.D., a board-certified dermatologist in New York City. Psoriatic arthritis occurs in less than 30 percent of patients with psoriasis and is more common in patients with extensive skin disease, who are diagnosed at a younger age. Additionally, Dr. Finney says psoriatic arthritis more frequently occurs in those who experience nail changes related to psoriasis, such as pitting, lifting, or orange splotches.

What Is Cdc Doing About Psoriasis

In 2010, CDC worked with experts in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and public health to develop a public health perspective that considers how these conditions affect the entire population. The resulting report is Developing and Addressing the Public Health Agenda for Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis pdf icon. You can read a short article about the agendaexternal icon in The American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

CDCs National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey , an intermittent source of national psoriasis data, has included questions about psoriasis as late as the 2013-2014 cycle. A recent analysis of NHANES data estimates that 7.4 million adults had psoriasis in 2013external icon.

  • Psoriasis causes patches of thick red skin and silvery scales. Patches are typically found on the elbows, knees, scalp, lower back, face, palms, and soles of feet, but can affect other places . The most common type of psoriasis is called plaque psoriasis.
  • Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory type of arthritis that eventually occurs in 10% to 20% of people with psoriasis. It is different from more common types of arthritis and is thought to be related to the underlying problem of psoriasis.
  • Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are sometimes considered together as psoriatic disease.

Who is at risk for psoriasis?

Anyone can get psoriasis. It occurs mostly in adults, but children can also get it. Men and women seem to have equal risk.

Can I get psoriasis from someone who has it?

Read Also: Can Arthritis Affect Your Eyes

Occurrence In The United States

According to the National Psoriasis Foundation, psoriatic arthritis affects about 1 million people in the United States, or about 30% of all persons with psoriasis. However, prevalence rates vary widely among studies. In one population-based study, less than 10% of patients with psoriasis developed clinically recognized psoriatic arthritis during a 30-year period. A random telephone survey of 27,220 US residents found a 0.25% prevalence rate for psoriatic arthritis in the general population and an 11% prevalence rate in patients with psoriasis. However, the exact frequency of the disorder in patients with psoriasis remains uncertain, with the estimated rate ranging from 5-30%.

Moreover, since the late 20th century, the incidence of psoriatic arthritis appears to have been rising in both men and women. Reasons for the increase are unknown it may be related to a true change in incidence or to a greater overall awareness of the diagnosis by physicians.

Understanding Psoriasis And Predisposition

Rheumatoid arthritis prevention.What is the difference ...

While we know psoriasis is caused by the immune system, the exact cause is not known. The same can be said for psoriatic arthritis. Statistically, about 40 percent of people with psoriatic arthritis have relatives with psoriatic arthritis or with psoriasis, but scientists do not know what genes lead to these conditions. Ongoing research is investigating the causes of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in order to predict who may develop these conditions and to invent new treatments.

You May Like: How To Fight Against Arthritis

Popular Articles
Related news