Thursday, September 29, 2022

What Causes Sudden Arthritis Flare Ups

Using Heat And Cold To Treat A Rheumatoid Arthritis Flare

Rheumatoid Arthritis: #1 cause of my RA flare-ups

One of the simplest, safest ways to ease joint symptoms from a rheumatoid arthritis flare can be done at home. Applying a warm or cold compress may help relieve RA pain, swelling, and stiffness. This approach works because temperature changes can affect inflammation, blood flow, and nerve sensation.

Keep in mind that heat and cold therapyreferred to as thermotherapy by medical researchersonly affects the area where it is applied. It will not change overall rheumatoid arthritis disease activity or pain/discomfort in the other parts of the body.

If Youve Got Arthritis Youve Probably Experienced The Intense Pain Of Flares Heres How To Handle Them

Youre feeling good, barely thinking about your chronic pain, and then wham an arthritis flare hits you like a Mack truck. These periods of increased disease activity take a toll on you physically and emotionally, especially because they can come on unexpectedly. If youve got either osteoarthritis or an inflammatory type of arthritis like rheumatoid arthritis, you probably know what were talking about.

So how can you deal with an arthritis flare-up when it happens? I remind myself, This, too, shall pass, arthritis patient Beth Bloomfield told us on Facebook. Like a kidney stone! another patient, Katie Resnick, joked back. Although arthritis flares are never pleasant, there are techniques that can help shorten their duration. Also important: Being able recognize when a flare is starting and avoid the triggers that may cause your flare-ups in the first place.

Can Flares Be Prevented

RA flares can happen randomly, so it’s unlikely you’ll be able to prevent every single one, but there are things you can do to reduce the likelihood of a flare. Maintain a nutritious diet, including plenty of vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids ask your doctor if you have questions about dietary supplements. Get regular exercise and plenty of sleep , and practice other good stress management skills, such as yoga or meditation.

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Signs Of A Rheumatoid Arthritis Flare

Whats more, people with rheumatoid arthritis have different receptors on their immune cells MHC receptors which are more likely to bind to self-proteins, explains Ashira Blazer, MD, a rheumatologist at New York University’s Langone Medical Center in New York City. Environmental triggers can aggravate the immune system and cause these proteins to end up in the joint space, which can lead to inflammation and damage. Also, during a flare, antigens make their way into the joints, and when immune cells in the joints become activated, the linings of the joints become inflamed. The result: Red, hot, tender, swollen joints signs of a flare.

How Arthritis Gloves Work

Osteoarthritis flare

Arthritis gloves may work through several mechanisms. Thermal gloves warm the hand, which can make you feel very comfortable and even take away some of the pain, says Karen Jacobs, EdD, OT, OTR, CPE, FAOTA, a clinical professor at Boston University and an occupational therapist who works with arthritis patients.

Others are compression gloves that provide pressure. Particularly when youre having a flare in the fingers and joints and just feeling really uncomfortable, the compression seems to help reduce the swelling and can help with some joint stiffness as well, says Jacobs. Compression may also improve blood circulation. Overall, arthritis gloves can make patients feel more relaxed and calm with a reduction in symptoms.

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Who Treats Reactive Arthritis

Diagnosing and treating reactive arthritis usually requires a team effort involving several types of health care professionals. The condition is primarily treated by:

  • Rheumatologists, who specialize in arthritis and other diseases of the bones, joints, and muscles.

Other health care specialists who may be involved in your care include:

  • Dermatologists, who specialize in conditions of the skin, hair, and nails.
  • Gynecologists, who specialize in the female reproductive system.
  • Mental health professionals, who can help people cope with difficulties in the home and workplace that may result from their medical conditions.
  • Occupational therapists, who teach ways to protect joints, minimize pain, perform activities of daily living, and conserve energy.
  • Ophthalmologists, who specialize in treating disorders and diseases of the eye.
  • Orthopaedists, who treat and perform surgery for bone and joint diseases.
  • Physical therapists, who improve quality of life through prescribed exercise, hands-on care, and patient education.
  • Primary care doctors, such as family physicians or internal medicine specialists, who coordinate care between the different health care providers and treat other problems as they arise.
  • Urologists, who treat diseases of the urinary tract and male reproductive system.

Just When You Thought Your Back Was Safe From Rheumatoid Arthritis An Ra Flare Up Strikes Your Spine Learn How To Manage And Prevent Ra Flare Ups

Managing your rheumatoid arthritis is an ongoing balancing act. Youve had your share of painful symptoms, and your rheumatologist has prescribed medication that should help you handle them. Youre also doing your best to follow your doctors lifestyle instructions, even though you may have hit a few bumps in the road. Overall, you think youre on a good path.

Learn how to manage RA flare ups in your spinal joints.

And then, you wake up one morning and you can barely get out of bed. Your joints feel swollen and stiff, and its a challenge to even get through your morning routine. Youre likely experiencing a rheumatoid arthritis flare up, and youre certainly not alone. Even people with well-controlled RA symptoms can be surprised by sudden flare ups.

Learning how to manage your RA flare ups will help you to better manage your overall health. By monitoring your daily activities, you can also minimize your chances of experiencing these uncomfortable episodes.

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What Are The Parts Of A Joint

Joints get cushioned and supported by soft tissues that prevent your bones from rubbing against each other. A connective tissue called articular cartilage plays a key role. It helps your joints move smoothly without friction or pain.

Some joints have a synovial membrane, a padded pocket of fluid that lubricates the joints. Many joints, such as your knees, get supported by tendons and ligaments. Tendons connect muscles to your bones, while ligaments connect bones to other bones.

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What Makes Arthritis Flare Up

Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is #2 cause of my RA flare-ups?

When you’re suffering from a painful condition like arthritis, you’re almost always looking for ways to keep your symptoms at bay.

We’ve all heard the old wives’ tale that when an achey joint is acting up it’s a sign that bad weather is on the way…but can it really be true that something like a change in weather can trigger your pain?

“It’s true the symptoms of arthritis can recede and flare up. It’s also true that a change in weather can sometimes trigger a flare-up, which is often magnified when a certain type of arthritis is not being well-managed,” says Dr. Syed Alam, rheumatologist at Houston Methodist.

“While you can’t control the weather, the good news is that you can avoid other triggers of arthritic flare-ups as long as you know what type of arthritis you have in the first place,” adds Dr. Alam.

Arthritis is a broad term for pain, tenderness or swelling in a particular joint , and the three most common types of arthritis are:

  • Rheumatoid arthritis when your immune system attacks the structure of your joint
  • Osteoarthritis wear and tear damage that breaks down the cushion in your joint
  • Gout when sharp crystals form and deposit in a joint

“When it comes to flare-ups of these types of arthritis, the triggers themselves aren’t actually the source of your pain. They’re just things that aggravate the underlying issues of the arthritis,” explains Dr. Alam.

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How To Treat An Arthritis Flare

Sometimes arthritis flare-ups cannot be prevented. At this point, all you can do is get through it the best you can. There are some things you can do that may help provide you some relief.

Make a Plan

You should try to have a plan in place for when you are experiencing arthritis flare-ups.

If you have unavoidable activities that cannot be canceled when your arthritis acts up, let the key people involved know what is happening that way, accommodations can be made.

Apply Heat or Cold

You can choose to use a hot or cold compact or a hot/cold cream, whichever better fits your needs. If you are using a heating pad or an ice pack, youll want to apply it directly to the painful area for 15-20 minute intervals throughout the day. For the hot/cold cream, youll need to follow the product instructions and be sure not to overuse the topical treatment.

Rest

When youre already in pain, its essential to get enough rest. You dont want to put more pressure on your inflamed joints.

You may feel like you are getting behind, but your body needs the time to rest to not prolong the pain. Dont push yourself during a flare.

Low-Impact Movement

While you must get plenty of rest during a flare, you have to be careful of being too still.

Its crucial to get in some low-impact movement like going for a short walk or stretching. There are also hand exercises you can do to keep the joints from becoming stiff.

Consult Your Doctor

Preventing Ra Flare Ups In The Back

When managing any chronic medical condition, its difficult to predict when a flare up will occur. As a result, there isnt a foolproof strategy for preventing one.

Dr. Mukai does have some advice that should minimize your risks of an RA flare up in the back. a healthy lifestyle including proper nutrition .Getting good sleep , reducing stress , and not smoking can all help to reduce risk of RA flareups, says Dr. Mukai.

Finally, Dr. Mukai offers bigger-picture recommendations that should help all RA patients better manage their condition. Patients in RA should have a good long-term relationship with their rheumatologists and understand that their disease can change over time, necessitating change in medications and need for multimodal treatment. Learning good self-care techniques early will go a long way in managing symptoms.

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Living With Reactive Arthritis

There are things you can do to help you live with reactive arthritis. These include:

  • Balance rest and exercise. Exercise can help keep your muscles strong and healthy, keep your joints moving as they should, and help you stay flexible. Check with your doctor before beginning an exercise routine.
  • Heat and cold therapies can lower joint pain.
  • Support devices such as a cane or walker can help you move around safely and lower pain.
  • Shoe inserts or braces can help support your joint and help lower pain and pressure on the area. This can be helpful when you stand or walk.
  • Visits to a mental health professional can help you cope, since having a painful condition like reactive arthritis can be challenging.

When To Contact A Doctor

Osteoarthritis flare

Although it is not always necessary to contact a doctor during an osteoarthritis flare-up, symptoms that persist for more than a few days may need medical treatment.

The doctor may request imaging tests, such as X-rays or MRI scans, to check for changes to joints and other damage. They will likely recommend medications to treat pain.

If necessary, the doctor may suggest additional treatments to address triggers, such as CBT for stress.

Osteoarthritis flare-ups are not always preventable, but some strategies can help minimize risk.

For example, people with osteoarthritis may find the following tips helpful:

  • Maintain a moderate weight by making healthy dietary choices and getting plenty of exercise.
  • Reduce stress through meditation, mindfulness, and deep breathing exercises.
  • Take measures to get enough sleep.
  • Engage in regular exercise to strengthen the bones, lubricate the joints, and increase muscle mass.
  • Wear supportive braces to help protect and stabilize the joints.
  • Use assistive devices to reduce stress on the joints.

Some foods and beverages that may help prevent inflammation include:

  • fresh fruits and vegetables, as they are good sources of antioxidants

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What Are Attacks Of Palindromic Rheumatism Like

Attacks usually start in one or two joints, often the hands, which quickly become painful, stiff and swollen. Other areas around the affected joints, such as the tendons, may also become painful and swollen. Attacks are sometimes called flares or flare-ups.

Attacks can move from joint to joint, and usually last for a few days. Eventually the attack stops, and your joints and tendons will return to normal.

No matter how often you have them, these attacks are not thought to cause damage to your joints. People with palindromic rheumatism normally feel well between attacks.

Some people feel very tired after having an attack. This is known as fatigue. This fatigue can last for a few days or weeks and might affect you physically. It can also affect your concentration and motivation.

Attacks of palindromic rheumatism come and go. But the pattern of attacks how often they happen, how long they last and what joints they involve is different for everyone.

Some people have less than one attack a year, while others have them more than once a week. Some people have attacks that last just a few hours, while some peoples last for several days. You might notice that your attacks are similar each time.

Palindromic rheumatism doesnt usually affect parts of the body outside the joints and tendons.

However, some people might also have a fever during an attack or develop nodules under the skin, near the affected joints.

What Is Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. The condition is also known as degenerative joint disease. It affects the body in a number of ways, but it primarily affects the joints of the hands, knee, hips, and lower back. Specifically, the cartilage within the joints are damaged. Cartilage is a spongy tissue that acts as a cushion between bones. It helps to limit the contact between the bones by providing a smooth interface. As the cartilage degrades, the bones do not have a cushion between them. As a result, the surface of the bones rub against each other, causing damage to the ends of the bone.

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What Do Doctors Do

It’s not always easy for doctors to diagnose JIA right away. JIA itself can have lots of different symptoms, and some infections, like Lyme disease, have similar symptoms to JIA. So doctors will want to rule out any other possibilities before deciding something is JIA.

If a doctor suspects a patient has JIA, he or she will ask about the person’s symptoms, find out if others in the family have had arthritis, and do a complete physical examination to look for joint swelling, eye problems, and rashes. A doctor may do blood tests and X-rays. In some cases, doctors may use a needle to take a sample of synovial fluid from a person’s joint.

Sometimes, a doctor might need to see a patient for several months to determine the particular type of JIA the person has.

What Can Trigger A Flare

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Flare-ups can vary in duration, intensity, and frequency, and they can be triggered by a variety of factors. If you have osteoarthritis which is the most common form of arthritis weight gain can put increased pressure on weight-bearing joints, including the hip.

If you have rheumatoid arthritis which is an autoimmune condition that affects the joints and other organs in the body hip arthritis flare-ups can be quelled if treated promptly. Infections such as a cold or flu virus can lead to flare-ups if you have RA, as they affect the immune system.

Some of the main factors that can cause an exacerbation, or flare-up, of hip arthritis include the following:

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Triggers For Flare Ups

Rheumatoid arthritis An RA flare is mostly due to inflammation, but what triggers inflammation? The triggers for inflammation are not specifically known yet, though extensive medical research is in progress. It may be stress, weather or too much physical activity. There is no definitive medical research proving weather impacts arthritis, but many patients have noted their joints react to a change in barometric pressure and humidity or when it is cold. Other triggers include infection or any illness compromising the immune system, and medications.

Osteoarthritis Flare ups are not triggered by inflammation from an immune system response, but inflammation may be one of the symptoms of an osteoarthritis flare. Scientifically proven flare triggers still do not exist, but there are certain activities that have often triggered flare ups. They include falling on or injuring a joint, repetitive motions and overuse. Other causes include infection, stress, weather and obesity or being overweight. In some cases, continued deterioration of the cartilage can lead to bone spurs developing which then further irritates the joint and possibly the surrounding tissue.

Psoriatic arthritis Most people experience a flare of psoriasis before a flare of psoriatic arthritis. The suspected triggers for a flare are stress, weight gain, physical trauma, joint strain, infection and medications.

Inflammatory Arthritis Versus Osteoarthritis

Knowing the type of arthritis, you have is the key to recognizing and managing a flare up. Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. It is caused by wear and tear of the cartilage linings of your joints. Since wear and tear takes time, this type occurs mostly in older people. It may be more common in a joint that you injured at some time. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling, but not inflammation.

Inflammatory arthritis may be caused by a disorder of your immune system. Your immune system is your bodys defense system against foreign invaders like germs. If you have an immune system disease called an autoimmune disease, your immune system attacks normal body tissues, including your joints. The symptom of the attack is inflammation of tissue in around your joints.

Autoimmune inflammatory arthritis affects many joints all over your body at the same time. This is also called inflammatory polyarthritis. This type of arthritis is a long-term disease that is often diagnosed in young adults. Both rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis are common types. Inflammation adds symptoms of redness and a feeling of warmth to affected joints along with pain and swelling.

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