Wednesday, September 28, 2022

What Blood Test Is Used To Diagnose Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis Blood Tests

Blood Test Could Predict Rheumatoid Arthritis

The rheumatoid arthritis blood tests that doctors perform to help diagnose the disease include:

  • Rheumatoid factor
  • C-Reactive Protein
  • Antinuclear Antibody

None of these tests can singularly conclude that a patient has rheumatoid arthritis. Rather, doctors look at the combined results from all, alongside a number of other criteria including physical symptoms and genetics, in order to reach a rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis.

Facts You Should Know About Rheumatoid Factor

  • Rheumatoid factor is an antibody that is detectable in the blood of approximately 80% of adults with rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Rheumatoid factor test is used by health care professionals to help in diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Sometimes rheumatoid factor can be detected in the blood of normal individuals and of those with other autoimmune diseases that are not rheumatoid arthritis.
  • In people with rheumatoid arthritis, high levels of rheumatoid factor can indicate a tendency toward more aggressive disease and/or a tendency to develop rheumatoid nodules and/or rheumatoid lung disease.

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Diagnosing Ra In Outlier Patients

Some cases of RA may be different or more difficult to diagnose then others, and certain routine tests and exams might not be as helpful. These include patients with a very recent onset of disease, people whose RA is inactive, and those with seronegative RA.

In these situations, making an RA diagnosis may take more time, or more weight may be given to certain factors, but RA can still be accurately established.

In people with inactive RA, for example, a rheumatologist may rely less on CRP and ESR tests and more on RF and anti-CCP tests, as well as evidence of characteristic joint erosions on imaging, if the disease has been present for long enough to develop erosions.

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Blood Tests For Rheumatoid Arthritis

RA is an autoimmune disease. Several blood tests can detect immune system changes or antibodies that may attack the joints and other organs. Other tests are used to measure the presence and degree of inflammation.

For blood tests, your doctor will draw a small sample from a vein. The sample is then sent to a lab for testing. Theres no single test to confirm RA, so your doctor may order multiple tests.

Medication & Herbal Remedies

Blood tests for rheumatoid arthritis: 10 tests for diagnosis

Its possible to treat symptoms of seronegative rheumatoid arthritis with medication. Ibuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications are recommended to decrease inflammation, especially during flare-ups.

Seronegative patients may also take methotrexate and other disease modifying antirheumatic drugs , like sulfasalazine, when anti-inflammatory drugs are not sufficient. In addition, intra-articular steroidal injections are also used to lower inflammation in that specific joint. Many patients find a significant reduction in pain and swelling with the use of effective home herbal remedies. In some cases, the symptoms are completely put into remission especially when taken in conjunction with a customized auto-immune diet.

Common herbal recommendations include fish oil, evening primrose, turmeric, and boswellia. Each has the potential to interact with your current medications, and should be discussed with your doctor when creating your treatment plan.

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Family & Personal Medical History

The patients medical history and family history are important factors in helping to reach a RA diagnosis. Studies have shown that the average risk of someone in the general population developing RA is about 1%. However, if there is a family history of the disease, the risk of another family member developing RA increases.

When diagnosing RA doctors ask about the following:

  • Patients family members who have or had RA
  • Patients existing or past autoimmune disorders
  • Patients family members with other autoimmune disorders
  • Other medical conditions, illnesses or complications

Depending on each patients unique set of answers, it can help doctors identify factors that lead to a RA diagnosis.

Reaching A Ra Diagnosis

Once all of these steps have been conducted, doctors will look at all of the test results and reach a conclusion based on the overall picture. Some doctors take a more symptom based approach to diagnosing RA while others rely on blood tests and medical history to confirm a RA diagnosis.

This is why its possible to be diagnosed with RA but not test positive for antibodies or have a medical history of RA in your family. If the symptoms themselves are consistent with RA, then it can still be diagnosed.

That being said, the main criteria for diagnosing RA do not change. The patient must exhibit symptoms for greater than six weeks, symmetrical symptoms, as well as multiple joints being affected including fingers and hands.

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The Diagnostic Criteria For Rheumatoid Arthritis

The diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis cant be established with just one test. Instead, rheumatologists rely on a combination of your medical history, a physical exam, laboratory tests, and sometimes imaging tests to pinpoint the disease.

They also try to rule out the possibility of other conditions that may resemble RA, such as lupus, psoriatic arthritis, gout, or osteoarthritis. This is called a differential diagnosis.

To begin the diagnostic process, a rheumatologist will take your medical history, which includes asking questions about your current symptoms particularly pain, swelling, and stiffness and their location, duration, and severity.

Theyll also ask about your familys medical history as it pertains to RA and other autoimmune conditions. Conditions like RA can be more common in families with RA or other immune system-related health problems. For example, research recently published in the journal Arthritis Care & Research found that people who have a first-degree relative with RA are more than twice as likely as the general population to develop RA. A family history of lupus, scleroderma, thyroid disease, or inflammatory bowel disease also substantially increased the risk of RA.

Your rheumatologist will also perform a physical examination, testing each of your joints for things like swelling, tenderness, and limited range of motion. The location of affected joints is important to diagnosis.

Amplification In The Synovium

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Once the generalized abnormal immune response has become established which may take several years before any symptoms occur plasma cells derived from B lymphocytes produce rheumatoid factors and ACPA of the IgG and IgM classes in large quantities. These activate macrophages through Fc receptor and complement binding, which is part of the intense inflammation in RA. Binding of an autoreactive antibody to the Fc receptors is mediated through the antibody’s N-glycans, which are altered to promote inflammation in people with RA.

This contributes to local inflammation in a joint, specifically the synovium with edema, vasodilation and entry of activated T-cells, mainly CD4 in microscopically nodular aggregates and CD8 in microscopically diffuse infiltrates. Synovial macrophages and dendritic cells function as antigen-presenting cells by expressing MHC class II molecules, which establishes the immune reaction in the tissue.

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What Blood Tests Are Used To Diagnose Rheumatoid Arthritis

The rheumatoid arthritis blood tests that doctors perform to help diagnose the disease include:

  • Rheumatoid factor

Correspondingly, what blood test shows rheumatoid arthritis?

Blood tests commonly used to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis include:

  • Rheumatoid factor.
  • Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate .
  • Antinuclear Antibody .

Additionally, what tests are done to diagnose arthritis? To diagnose arthritis, your doctor will consider your symptoms, perform a physical exam to check for swollen joints or loss of motion, and use blood tests and X-rays to confirm the diagnosis. X-rays and blood tests also help distinguish the type of arthritis you have.

Correspondingly, can arthritis be detected in a blood test?

Blood Tests to Diagnose Arthritis. Your doctor will use several different blood tests to help diagnose you with rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions. In general, if you have RA but don’t have high RF, your disease will be less severe. RF levels may stay high even if you go into remission.

What is the blood test for rheumatoid factor?

A rheumatoid factor test is one of a group of blood tests primarily used to help pinpoint a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. These other tests may include: Anti-nuclear antibody Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies.

Assessing Your Physical Ability

If you have been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, your specialist will do an assessment to see how well you’re coping with everyday tasks.

You may be asked to fill in a questionnaire on how well you can do things like dress, walk and eat, and how good your grip strength is.

This assessment may be repeated after your treatment, to see if you have made any improvements.

Further information

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Other Autoantibodies In Ra

RF and anti-CCP are the main autoantibody tests that are used in RA. However, there are several others including antibodies to carbamylated proteins , anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin and several others. In addition, when an individual initially develops RA, their health care provider may perform other tests that can be related to other autoimmune conditions that can be similar to RA. These tests include anti-nuclear antibodies and several others. If you have abnormalities of these other tests, please ask your health-care provider for more information.

Living With Rheumatoid Arthritis

Blood Tests for Diagnosing Rheumatoid Arthritis

Research shows that people who take part in their own care report less pain and make fewer doctor visits. They also enjoy a better quality of life.

Self-care can help you play a role in managing your RA and improving your health. You can:

  • Learn about rheumatoid arthritis and its treatments.
  • Use exercises and relaxation techniques to reduce your pain and help you stay active.
  • Communicate well with your health care team so you can have more control over your disease.
  • Reach out for support to help cope with the physical emotional, and mental effects of rheumatoid arthritis.

Participating in your care can help build confidence in your ability to perform day-to-day activities, allowing you to lead a full, active, and independent life.

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What Do The Results Mean

If rheumatoid factor is found in your blood, it may indicate:

About 20 percent of people with rheumatoid arthritis have little or no rheumatoid factor in their blood. So even if your results were normal, your health care provider may order more tests to confirm or rule out a diagnosis.

If your results were not normal, it doesn’t necessarily mean you have a medical condition needing treatment. Some healthy people have rheumatoid factor in their blood, but it’s not clear why.

Learn more about laboratory tests, reference ranges, and understanding results.

On 2nd February 2022 The Voices Of Many People Having Rheumatoid Disease Would Be Heard As On This Day The Rheumatoid Awareness Day Is Held The Rheumatoid Disease Is Also Known As Rheumatoid Arthritis

On 2nd February, 2022, the voices of many people, having rheumatoid disease would be heard, as on this day, the Rheumatoid Awareness Day is held. The Rheumatoid disease is also known as rheumatoid arthritis .

Individuals suffering from Rheumatoid Arthritis, their body’s immune system tend to attack its own healthy cells inside specific joints, leading to an inflammatory response.

Symptoms of Rheumatoid Arthritis

Pain, redness or swelling in one or more joints throughout the body.

Joint stiffness and pain in the morning, which tend to last for a while, but loosen up as you move.

Tingling or numbness in the extremities.

Fever

Joint deformity

Early intervention and aggressive management

Rheumatoid arthritis can be very aggressive and it may lead to other systemic complication as well as health problems, which include heart disease, diabetes and osteoporosis. Hence, it is so significant to witness a doctor, if you tend to have symptoms, which may be associated with rheumatoid arthritis as soon as possible, early intervention as well as aggressive management are significant to preserve mobility, function as well as higher quality of life.

How is Rheumatoid Arthritis Diagnosed?

To make a precise diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis is not always easy, hence sometimes the symptoms might be vague or mistaken of those of another condition. Accurate diagnosis is possible, your doctor would likely apply the range of tests as well as exams to sort out, what’s causing your symptoms.

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Diagnosing Rheumatoid Arthritis With The Rheumatoid Factor Test

Patients who test positive for rheumatoid factor arent necessarily diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis right away. There must also be a clear history of consistent rheumatoid arthritis symptoms.

If your doctor suspects symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, other criteria must first be taken into consideration before reaching a diagnosis. The presence of rheumatoid factor alone does not typically lead to an immediate rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis. Doctors look at physical symptoms, medical history and may conduct other blood tests, like anti-CCP, as well as imaging scans to help identify the condition.

Depending on the final diagnosis, in some cases the presence of rheumatoid factor in a patients blood may help determine the type of treatment that will be provided to that patient, such as disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs .

A positive rheumatoid factor test along with a rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis can potentially help the doctor determine a prognosis and an appropriate course of treatment. This may depend on a variety of factors.

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Who Should Get Testing

Ask The Rheumatologist: Which Tests Should You Do to Diagnose Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Patients who experience inflammation, pain, or loss of mobility in joints should discuss testing for rheumatoid arthritis with their doctor, especially if symptoms occur in multiple joints or in matching joints on both sides of the body, such as both wrists. Other symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis include:

  • Stiffness in the morning for 30 minutes or longer
  • Fatigue
  • Dry eyes and mouth
  • Firm lumps beneath the skin

These symptoms are often due to something other than RA when they last less than six weeks. The longer a patient experiences symptoms, the more likely the symptoms are to be due to RA.

Diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis in its early stages can be challenging, as patients may experience few symptoms, but early diagnosis is important because early treatment may prevent joints from worsening or at least slow the process. When symptoms are present, they often differ from person to person and mimic the symptoms of other diseases. Testing is an important part of the process of determining whether symptoms are due to RA or another condition.

After receiving a diagnosis of RA, its important for patients to continue rheumatoid arthritis testing. Testing can assist doctors in assessing the severity of RA, as well as monitoring the efficacy of treatment, tracking disease progression, and detecting potentially serious side effects of treatment drugs.

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What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis

Similar to other autoimmune conditions, rheumatoid arthritis causes your immune system to attack the healthy tissues and cells in your body. Although RA usually damages the joints, it can affect other parts of the body, such as the eyes, heart, or lungs. RA can cause inflammation in joints located in the wrists, hands, knees, and ankles.

Symptoms can vary from person to person, but some early signs of RA include pain and tenderness in the joints. Over time, symptoms may get worse and progress to redness, stiffness, and swelling in the joints. Some people also have a low-grade fever and fatigue.

The exact cause of RA is not known, but several factors increase the risk of having this disease. It occurs more often in older adults and women. Smoking and being overweight also raise the risk of having RA. Certain genes have been linked to a higher chance of developing RA.

Illustration by Verywell

Other Diagnostic Methods Used To Confirm Rheumatoid Arthritis

Blood tests arent the only method that can be used to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis. You might also have a variety of other tests done to help confirm rheumatoid arthritis. These include:

  • Physical assessment. A physical assessment can help determine how much your symptoms are impacting your daily life. You might be asked how well you can do daily tasks such as showering, eating, and dressing. A physical therapist might also assess your grip, walk, and balance.
  • Joint scan. A joint scan looks for inflammation and damage in your joints. It can help confirm a rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis.
  • Imaging tests. X-rays and MRIs create detailed pictures of your bones, muscles, and joints that can help diagnose rheumatoid arthritis.

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Treatment Of Rheumatoid Arthritis

Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis continues to improve, which can give many people relief from symptoms, improving their quality of life. Doctors may use the following options to treat RA:

  • Medications.
  • Routine monitoring and ongoing care.
  • Complementary therapies.

Your doctor may recommend a combination of treatments, which may change over time based on your symptoms and the severity of your disease. No matter which treatment plan your doctor recommends, the goals are to help:

  • Relieve pain.
  • Prevent, slow, or stop joint and organ damage.
  • Improve your ability to participate in daily activities.

Rheumatoid arthritis may start causing joint damage during the first year or two that a person has the disease, so early diagnosis and treatment are very important.

Symptoms Of Seronegative Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis Blood Test: How Accurate Is It Really?

Seronegative rheumatoid arthritis patients must possess a distinct set of symptoms in order to be diagnosed. This is because the lack of antibodies in the blood makes it more difficult to reach a rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis.

Some of the most important symptoms in diagnosing seronegative rheumatoid arthritis include:

  • Joint pain, stiffness specifically in the hands but also in knees, elbows, hips, feet and ankles
  • Joint swelling and redness
  • Morning stiffness lasting longer than 30 minutes
  • Fatigue
  • Eye redness

Though this is not an exhaustive list, the majority of these will support a rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis. If we compare these symptoms to seropositive rheumatoid arthritis symptoms, there are many similarities. However, many patients see these symptoms evolve and change over time.

It is thought that seropositive patients experience a more severe disease course than seronegative patients. But studies have also shown that in some patient cases, the progression is comparable and sometimes is there is little difference. This is where it becomes complicated in trying to classify rheumatoid arthritis into sub-types and to reach a solid diagnosis.

There are some symptoms that are thought to be rheumatoid arthritis in seronegative patients, but later turn out to be other conditions. These cases mainly involve differences in the types of joints and areas affected as well as the levels of inflammation.

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