Tuesday, September 27, 2022

How To Know If I Have Rheumatoid Arthritis

Does Ra Cause Hair Loss

How do I know if I have Rheumatoid Arthritis. Dr. Hatem Eleishi

People with autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, can experience hair loss as a troubling symptom of their disease. Other times though, the cause of the shedding locks could be the medications used to treat the disease.

Does rheumatoid arthritis make you tired? People with rheumatoid arthritis typically have several permanently inflamed joints. The inflammation inside the body can lead to general physical weakness, drowsiness and exhaustion. This feeling of extreme tiredness is also called fatigue. Some people find this to be the worst symptom of the disease.

Does rheumatoid arthritis show up on xrays?

X-rays can show whether joint damage you have, though damage may not show up early on. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound give a more detailed picture of your joints. These scans arent normally used to diagnose RA, but they can help doctors find it early.

How do doctors diagnose rheumatoid arthritis? Rheumatoid arthritis can be difficult to diagnose in its early stages because the early signs and symptoms mimic those of many other diseases. There is no one blood test or physical finding to confirm the diagnosis. During the physical exam, your doctor will check your joints for swelling, redness and warmth.

What Is The Prognosis For People Who Have Rheumatoid Arthritis

Although there is no cure for rheumatoid arthritis, there are many effective methods for decreasing the pain and inflammation and slowing down the disease process. Early diagnosis and effective treatment are very important.

Extensive research is being done to learn the cause of rheumatoid arthritis and the best methods of treatment.

Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 11/17/2017.

References

Diagnosis And Treating Arthritis

Existing Rheumatology Reports keeps in mind that it can be difficult for medical professionals to detect dactylitis properly. This is true even for PsA, for which this symptom is a hallmark feature.

Furthermore, there have not been enough research studies on treatment of dactylitis to determine what can help control the swelling.

The Current Rheumatology Reports research states that infliximab is the one medication that has actually been revealed to assist with this symptom in scientific trials. Nevertheless, the trials specified to PsA victims and not RA patients.

Read Also: How Do You Know You Have Arthritis

Also Check: Arthritis Drugs Side Effects

Stiffness In The Joints

In addition to pain, this disease causes stiffness in the affected joints. You may have difficulty getting out of bed or walking in the morning because of stiff and painful ankles, knees, or feet. This stiffness is usually worse in the mornings and can last for 45 minutes or more.

RA can also trigger swelling in the affected joints. Long-term inflammation can cause you to feel physically exhausted.

What Are Tips For Managing And Living With Rheumatoid Arthritis

Anyone have rheumatoid arthritis ? I

The following tips are helpful in managing and living with RA:

  • Live a healthy lifestyle: Eat healthy foods. Avoid sugar and junk food. Quit smoking, or don’t start. Don’t drink alcohol in excess. These common-sense measures have an enormous impact on general health and help the body function at its best.
  • Exercise: Discuss the right kind of exercise for you with your doctor, if necessary.
  • Rest when needed, and get a good night’s sleep. The immune system functions better with adequate sleep. Pain and mood improve with adequate rest.
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions about medications to maximize effectiveness and minimize side effects.
  • Communicate with your doctor about your questions and concerns. They have experience with many issues that are related to rheumatoid arthritis.

Recommended Reading: Reduce Arthritis Swelling In Fingers

How Is Ra Diagnosed

RA is diagnosed by reviewing symptoms, conducting a physical examination, and doing X-rays and lab tests. Its best to diagnose RA earlywithin 6 months of the onset of symptomsso that people with the disease can begin treatment to slow or stop disease progression . Diagnosis and effective treatments, particularly treatment to suppress or control inflammation, can help reduce the damaging effects of RA.

What Are The Different Types Of Rheumatoid Arthritis

Symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis usually begin gradually in several joints. Sometimes the symptoms begin only in one joint, and sometimes the symptoms begin initially in the whole body, with generalized stiffness and aching, and then localize to the joints.

  • Typical “classic” rheumatoid arthritis is the most common type of rheumatoid arthritis. Classic rheumatoid arthritis involves three or more joints. Usually, people have a gradual onset of joint pain, stiffness, and joint swelling, usually in the fingers, wrists, and forefeet. Elbows, shoulders, hips, ankles and knees are also commonly affected.
  • About 80% of people with rheumatoid arthritis are classified as “seropositive,” which simply means the rheumatoid factor blood test is abnormal. Some people with an abnormal rheumatoid factor also have an abnormal anti-CCP blood test. This is another blood test for rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Approximately 20% of people with rheumatoid arthritis are classified as “seronegative,” which means the rheumatoid factor blood test is negative, or normal. In this case, the anti-CCP blood test may be abnormal or normal. Other blood tests, such as the ESR measure of inflammation, may be abnormal.

Palindromic rheumatism

Atypical presentations of RA

  • Persistent arthritis of just one joint may be the first symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis in some people.
  • Some people experience generalized aching, stiffness, weight loss, and fatigue as their initial symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.
YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

You May Like: Severe Arthritis Symptoms

Answers From Our Doctors

Your doctor will talk with you about your symptoms and also do some tests to decide if you have RA. With that knowledge, there are some guidelines commonly used.

These criteria were developed by the American College of Rheumatology in 1988 and are still used to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis. Of these seven criteria, four are needed for a diagnosis. Criteria 1 through 4 must have been present for at least 6 weeks.

1.Morning stiffness lasting at least 1 hour before major improvement

2.Arthritis in three or more of the following joint areas on either side of the body: middle joint of the fingers, the knuckles , wrist, elbow, knee, ankle, or the joint between the toes and the foot

3.Arthritis in the hand joints: specifically in the wrist, the knuckles, or the middle joint of the fingers

4.Joint swelling of the same joint on both sides of the body or joint swelling on both sides of the body affecting the middle joint of the fingers, the knuckles, and/or the joint between the toes and the foot

5.Bumps that develop under the skin over pressure points or areas where bones protrude.

6.Positive RF test

7.X-ray changes that show decalcified bone or uneven patches of bone erosion around only the joints affected by rheumatoid arthritis. Thinning bones throughout the body unrelated to rheumatoid joints do not qualify.

What Are Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment Options

Rheumatoid Arthritis or Osteoarthritis: Which one do you have?
  • There is no known cure for rheumatoid arthritis.
  • To date, the goal of treatment in rheumatoid arthritis is to reduce joint inflammation and pain, maximize joint function, and prevent joint destruction and deformity.
  • Early medical intervention has been shown to be important in improving outcomes.
  • Aggressive management can improve function, stop damage to joints as monitored on X-rays, and prevent work disability.
  • Optimal RA treatment involves a combination of medicines, rest, joint-strengthening exercises, joint protection, and patient education.
  • Treatment is customized according to many factors such as disease activity, types of joints involved, general health, age, and patient occupation.
  • RA treatment is most successful when there is close cooperation between the doctor, patient, and family members.

Read Also: Painful Arthritis

When To Seek Treatment

The following are general guidelines of when to seek treatment for your RA progression:

When you first suspect symptoms Regularly during the first few years of diagnosis If you suspect you are experiencing progressive rheumatoid arthritis If you feel your condition is worsening in any way or new symptoms appear

The 2010 Acr/eular Classification Criteria Guidelines

Sometimes people who have been diagnosed with RA take part in studies or clinical trials perhaps to try a promising drug or study ways to improve quality of life.

To identify RA patients with typical features of RA who are suitable for these important studies, scientists use a set of guidelines created by the American College of Rheumatology and the European League Against Rheumatism. These are called the 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria.

For classification purposes to be considered for enrollment into studies, patients must first have at least one inflamed joint that cant be explained by another condition. Then theyre evaluated for classification based on the following:

  • Joint involvement. Which joints are swollen? How many are affected? Are they large or small?
  • Serology test results. What are the results of RF and/or ACPA tests?
  • Acute-phase reactant test results. Are the results of CRP and/or ESR tests normal or abnormal?
  • Duration of symptoms. Have symptoms been around more or less than six weeks?

Others who may be eligible for studies include long-time RA patients whose past symptoms fulfill the criteria, those with joint damage very characteristic of RA, and those with new RA who are receiving treatment.

Also Check: Remedy For Arthritis In Hands

Your Injuries Seem To Take A Long Time To Heal

Its possible to think you have an injurysuch as a sprained ankle that doesnt seem to healwhen the symptoms are actually due to RA.

This is more common in younger people, says Lisa A. Mandl, MD, MPH, assistant attending rheumatologist at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City.

One day a patient is playing soccer and the next day her knee is swollen, she says. “I have seen people who have had two arthroscopic surgeries and extensive physical therapy in their knee and they have rheumatoid arthritis.”

Does Stress Affect Rheumatoid Arthritis

How Do I Know if I Have Rheumatoid Arthritis or Osteoarthritis in My ...

Patients commonly report that stress, either physical or emotional, was present or severe when their RA began. This is true in other autoimmune disorders as well. Since the mind-body connection is very real, most doctors agree that there is a link between stress and disease onset or flares.

Because there are clear interactions between the nervous, immune and endocrine systems, the impact of stress on disease presentation and severity is explainable in physiologic terms. Obviously, life is stressful. Thus, how to employ stress reduction in a therapeutic regimen is up to the individual patient, in concert with the physician. Many patients have found benefits from mindfulness programs that facilitate learning tools to reduce the impact of stress.

Also Check: What Is Considered A High Level Of Rheumatoid Factor

Lab And Blood Tests For Ra

Here are some of the things you can expect to happen at your appointment if the doctor thinks you have RA.

Personal and family medical history: Your doctor will ask about your past and your relativesâ. If someone in your family tree has RA, you may be more likely to have the disease.

Physical exam: The doctor will check your joints for swelling, tenderness, and range of motion. RA tends to strike several joints.

Antibody blood tests: Doctors look for certain proteins that show up in your blood when you have RA. These proteins mistakenly target healthy cells and kick off the inflammation process. So a high or positive test result means inflammation is in your body.

  • Rheumatoid factor : high levels
  • Anti-CCP : high levels
  • ANA, or antinuclear antibodies: the results are positive or negative

Not all people with RA have these proteins.

Other blood tests: Besides RF and anti-CCP, other blood tests could include:

Complete blood count: It helps your doctor find anemia , which is common in RA. It looks for four things:

  • White blood cells 4.8-10.8
  • Hematocrit 42-52
  • Platelets 150-450

Erythrocyte sedimentation rate: This measures how fast your red blood cells clump and fall to the bottom of a glass tube within an hour. Your doctor might call it a sed rate.

Normal ranges are:

  • Men younger than 50: 0-15 mm/h
  • Men older than 50: 0-20 mm/h
  • Women younger than 50: 0-20 mm/h
  • Women older than 50: 0-30 mm/h

What Causes Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease. This means that your immune system which usually fights infection attacks the cells that line your joints by mistake, making them swollen, stiff and painful.

Over time, this can damage the joint itself, the cartilage and nearby bone.

Its not clear what triggers this problem with the immune system, although you are at an increased risk if you are a woman, you have a family history of rheumatoid arthritis, or you smoke.

You May Like: How To Relieve Arthritis Pain In Lower Back

Recommended Reading: Can Arthritis Cause Nerve Pain

Your Doctor Cant Fully Appreciate Potential New Symptoms Via Telemedicine

In the COVID-19 pandemic era, people with rheumatoid arthritis cant always make it into the doctors office for a physical visit. But a telemedicine, or telehealth, appointment, which is unquestionably better than not checking in with health professionals at all, may not detect that the disease is progressing as well as an in-person visit.

Domingues says that rheumatologists should definitely notice if joints are swollen and warm to the touch in an office consultation signs of active inflammation but they may not catch the severity of those symptoms on a computer screen. If were not physically examining them, the communication between doctors and patients needs to be even better, Domingues says. He says to make sure that you mention how your joints feel when you wake up, how much stiffness you experience in the morning and for how long, if youre able to make a full fist early in the day, and if you see red, warm, or swollen joints. Those are the pivotal signs of worsening RA, he says.

What Are The Less Common Forms Of Rheumatoid Arthritis

What is arthritis and how do I know if I have it?

Rheumatoid arthritis can begin in less common forms. For example, it can begin with the involvement of only a single joint or a few joints. Sometimes, this can later evolve to the more common presentation of many joints on both sides of the body.

  • Rarely, the earliest symptom of rheumatoid disease is inflammation of a body area that does not even involve a joint. For example, the lining of the lungs can become inflamed to cause pleurisy many months before arthritis develops.
  • Occasionally, only a few joints are involved and the doctor may suspect another type of inflammatory arthritis. Again, this can sometimes only later evolve to become the more typical symmetrical polyarthritis by including many joints on both sides of the body.
  • The caveat is that by recognizing the early symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis rheumatologists and their patients can address the disease early, thereby affording optimal outcomes for those affected.

Don’t Miss: Mayo Clinic On Arthritis

Stick To Your Ra Treatment Plan

This is key to ease symptoms and reduce the risk of deformity, says Dr. Sachs. Depending on the severity of your symptoms and how long youve had rheumatoid arthritis, your rheumatologist may prescribe a combination of medications. The goal of RA treatment is to stop systemic inflammation so you can achieve low disease activity or remission, which can prevent symptoms like pain and fatigue, as well as long-term joint and organ damage. Commonly prescribed medications include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to relieve pain and reduce inflammation, steroids to reduce inflammation and slow joint damage, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs to slow the progression of RA, or biologics, which are more complex, targeted DMARDs that act on certain immune system pathways that trigger inflammation.

What Are The Types Of Arthritis

Arthritis most often affects areas in or around joints. Joints are parts of the body where bones meet such as your knee. The ends of the bones are covered by cartilage, a spongy material that acts as a shock absorber to keep bones from rubbing together. The joint is enclosed in a capsule called the synovium. The synoviums lining releases a slippery fluid that helps the joint move smoothly and easily. Muscles and tendons support the joint and help you move. Different types of arthritis can affect one or more parts of a joint. This often results in a change of shape and alignment in the joints.

Certain types of arthritis can also affect other parts of the body, such as the skin and internal organs. There are more than 100 different types of arthritis. It is important to know which type of arthritis you have so you can treat it properly. If you dont know which type you have, call your doctor or ask during your next visit. Some common types of arthritis are described below.

Dont Miss: How Does Methotrexate Help Rheumatoid Arthritis

Read Also: Arthritis At 30 Symptoms

When Should I See A Specialist For Rheumatoid Arthritis

In general, patients with RA will benefit from seeing a specialist as early as possible. Most often the specialists treating this disease are trained in rheumatology. Their knowledge of medications to treat this disease can help patients make informed decisions consistent with their values and goals. These specialists can also help provide a balanced perspective on the benefits of treating the disease well vs. any potential side effects.

Patients diagnosed with RA are encouraged to become the captain of their multidisciplinary team of health providers. These include the primary care physician, the rheumatologist, the physical therapist, social worker, education programs and other members of the health care system will bring about a coordinated treatment program that is both safe and effective. The primary care physician or internist commonly works in partnership with a rheumatologist. Referral to a specialist in rheumatology most commonly occurs in the following situations:

  • when the diagnosis is in question
  • at the start of therapy, in order to provide expert input into the optimal medication and physical therapy regimen
  • during the course of the illness to define response to or alteration in the treatment regimen
  • in the setting of possible medication side effects
  • progressive disease despite therapy
  • a single joint that is leading to significant functional limitation
  • the presence of fever, marked fatigue, or weight loss
  • prior to orthopedic surgery

Popular Articles
Related news