Monday, December 5, 2022

How Can I Tell If I Have Rheumatoid Arthritis

What Are The Treatments For Rheumatoid Arthritis

How do I know if I have Rheumatoid Arthritis. Dr. Hatem Eleishi

RA is usually treated with a combination of medications to relieve swelling and pain while regulating the immune system. Joint surgery to relieve pain and disability, including joint replacement, may also be considered when these nonsurgical methods have failed to provide lasting benefit.

With early detection and intervention, RA and other forms of inflammatory arthritis can be treated very effectively. The connects patients quickly and efficiently with a rheumatologist who can evaluate their joint pain and get each patient started on an appropriate course of treatment. HSS also offers specialized for people with RA.

Today, we are blessed with a deeper understanding of the pathogenesis and characteristics of RA and the availability of safe and effective medications that can alter the natural history of RA and improve function. We start with the premise that RA is eminently controllable, and the goal of our therapies is “no evidence of disease.” That means no signs of redness, warmth, swelling or tenderness and normal function. Since we would not accept uncontrolled illness in angina, chronic obstructive lung disease, hypertension or diabetes, we should similarly not accept it in RA. Luckily, today, we have the therapeutic tools to make this happen.

Starting And Raising A Family

If you are taking medicines for rheumatoid arthritis, let your healthcare team know if you want to start a family or if you are worried about becoming pregnant while on medication.

Some medications, such as methotrexate, leflunomide and biological treatments, should not be taken by men or women while they are trying for a baby. The doctors and nurses will work with you to ensure your rheumatoid arthritis is controlled while you are trying to get pregnant.

Babies and young children are physically and mentally demanding for any parent, but particularly so if you have rheumatoid arthritis. If you are struggling to cope, it may help to talk to other people in the same situation as you. You may also be able to get additional support from your health visitor or occupational therapist to help you manage your young family.

What Happens In Ra

With continuous swelling and inflammation of your joints, the joint capsule remains stretched and can no longer hold the joint in its proper position. As a result, the joint may become unstable and this can lead to joint damage. The joints affected and the extent to which this happens varies a great deal from person to person. RA usually affects the small joints in your hands and feet, but it can affect many joints including your ankles, elbows, wrists, hips, knees, neck and shoulders. The pain, stiffness, fatigue and whole-body symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis can be disabling and can lead to difficulty with daily activities. Effective treatment by a rheumatologist can prevent joint damage and reduce other symptoms of RA.

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Outlook For Rheumatoid Arthritis

Two in 10 people with rheumatoid arthritis have a mild form and can lead a normal life for many years. One in 10 with the disease become severely disabled. Seven in 10 have an intermediate form of the disease and can lead full lives but will need to adapt their lifestyle.

Medications for rheumatoid arthritis have improved over the years. Taking medications alongside making lifestyle changes can significantly improve your outlook for rheumatoid arthritis.

The Diagnostic Criteria For Rheumatoid Arthritis

Get Rheumatoid Symptoms And Treatment Pics

The diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis cant be established with just one test. Instead, rheumatologists rely on a combination of your medical history, a physical exam, laboratory tests, and sometimes imaging tests to pinpoint the disease.

They also try to rule out the possibility of other conditions that may resemble RA, such as lupus, psoriatic arthritis, gout, or osteoarthritis. This is called a differential diagnosis.

To begin the diagnostic process, a rheumatologist will take your medical history, which includes asking questions about your current symptoms particularly pain, swelling, and stiffness and their location, duration, and severity.

Theyll also ask about your familys medical history as it pertains to RA and other autoimmune conditions. Conditions like RA can be more common in families with RA or other immune system-related health problems. For example, research recently published in the journal Arthritis Care & Research found that people who have a first-degree relative with RA are more than twice as likely as the general population to develop RA. A family history of lupus, scleroderma, thyroid disease, or inflammatory bowel disease also substantially increased the risk of RA.

Your rheumatologist will also perform a physical examination, testing each of your joints for things like swelling, tenderness, and limited range of motion. The location of affected joints is important to diagnosis.

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How Does A Normal Joint Work

A joint is where two bones meet. Most of our joints are designed to allow the bones to move in certain directions and within certain limits.

For example, the knee is the largest joint in the body and one of the most complicated. It must be strong enough to take our weight and must lock into position, so we can stand upright.

It also has to act as a hinge, so we can walk, and needs to twist and turn when we run or play sports.

The end of each bone is covered with cartilage that has a very smooth, slippery surface. The cartilage allows the ends of the bones to move against each other, almost without rubbing.

The joint is held in place by the synovium, which contains thick fluid to protect the bones and joint.

The synovium has a tough outer layer that holds the joint in place and stops the bones moving too far.

Strong cords called tendons anchor the muscles to the bones.

What Are The Risk Factors For Developing Rheumatoid Arthritis

There are several risk factors for developing rheumatoid arthritis. These include:

  • Family history: Youre more likely to develop RA if you have a close relative who also has it.
  • Sex: Women and people designated female at birth are two to three times more likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Smoking:Smoking increases a persons risk of rheumatoid arthritis and makes the disease worse.
  • Obesity: Your chances of developing RA are higher if you have obesity.

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Ra Diet: What Foods To Eat If You Have Rheumatoid Arthritis

Before starting a new diet, you should consult your doctor to ensure you are making proper choices to support your over medical health.. Below are some of the best diets to follow for helping to reduce RA inflammation and improve overall health:. First of all, weight loss is a common symptom in RA patients.. This is not considered healthy weight loss.. A proper diet for RA that is rich in these vitamins and minerals is important for keeping patients healthy.

Rheumatoid Factor And Anti

Rheumatoid Arthritis – Signs & Symptoms | Johns Hopkins Medicine

One blood test measures levels of rheumatoid factors in the blood. Rheumatoid factors are proteins that the immune system produces when it attacks health tissue.

About half of all people with rheumatoid arthritis have high levels of rheumatoid factors in their blood when the disease starts, but about 1 in 20 people without rheumatoid arthritis also test positive.

A related blood test known as anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide test is also available. Anti-CCPs are antibodies also produced by the immune system.

People who test positive for anti-CCP are very likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis, but not everybody with rheumatoid arthritis has this antibody.

Those who test positive for both rheumatoid factor and anti-CCP may be more likely to have severe rheumatoid arthritis requiring higher levels of treatment.

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Rheumatoid Arthritis And Coronavirus

Treatments for rheumatoid arthritis often suppress your immune system, which can increase your risk of getting coronavirus. Treatments that suppress your immune system include:

  • Biologics this includes abatacept, adalimumab, anakinra, belimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, infliximab, ixekizumab, rituximab , sarilumab, secukinumab, tocilizumab and ustekinumab
  • DMARDs this includes azathioprine, ciclosporin, leflunomide, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil, mycophenolic acid, sirolimus and tacrolimus
  • JAK inhibitors this includes baricitinib, tofacitinib and upadacitinib

However, it is important that you do not stop taking your medication for rheumatoid arthritis during the coronavirus pandemic. If you do, your risk of complications and flare-ups will significantly increase.

If your doctor has identified you as “clinically extremely vulnerable”, strictly follow all coronavirus guidelines, including:

  • Not seeing anyone outside your social bubble
  • Staying at home whenever possible and avoiding crowded spaces
  • Staying two metres away from people
  • Washing your hands regularly and using hand sanitiser
  • Wearing face coverings when you are outside
  • Working from home

You should be extra careful if you:

Ra Vs Oa Epidemiology

The primary difference between RA and OA is the underlying nature of the disease. RA is an autoimmune disorder that produces inflammatory joint symptoms throughout the body. OA is a degenerative condition that is the result of increased wear and tear on joints. OA may produce inflammatory symptoms as well, but it primarily destroys joint cartilage over time.

OA affects an estimated 27 million Americans while only 1.3 million Americans have RA. Both RA and OA are more prevalent in women than in men. RA can develop in patients anytime between the ages of 30 and 60 years old. OA generally develops later in life.

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How Is Ra Diagnosed

RA is diagnosed by reviewing symptoms, conducting a physical examination, and doing X-rays and lab tests. Its best to diagnose RA earlywithin 6 months of the onset of symptomsso that people with the disease can begin treatment to slow or stop disease progression . Diagnosis and effective treatments, particularly treatment to suppress or control inflammation, can help reduce the damaging effects of RA.

Whats The Age Of Onset For Rheumatoid Arthritis

8 Signs and Symptoms of Rheumatoid Arthritis

RA usually starts to develop between the ages of 30 and 60. But anyone can develop rheumatoid arthritis. In children and young adults usually between the ages of 16 and 40 its called young-onset rheumatoid arthritis . In people who develop symptoms after they turn 60, its called later-onset rheumatoid arthritis .

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Other Possible Causes Of Hand Pain

Hand pain is also a sign of Dupuytrens contracture, a condition in which the tissue of the palm and fingers becomes thickened and tight, causing the fingers to curl inward. Its not clear why Dupuytrens contracture develops, though those who smoke, drink a lot of alcohol, and have seizures or diabetes are more vulnerable to developing it.

Your doctor will also consider whether your hand pain could be due to carpal tunnel syndrome, says Dr. Byram. RA can be a cause of carpal tunnel syndrome, so if we see someone who has carpal tunnel, well want to make sure they dont have RA. Carpal tunnel is a condition that occurs when one of the major nerves to the hand the median nerve is squeezed or compressed as it travels through the wrist, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

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Other Causes Of Knee Pain

Sprain or strain to the knee

Injuries to the muscles and ligaments in the knee can lead to pain. Strains and sprains are often due to twisting your knee or a blow to the knee. Falling can lead to knee injuries like this. The symptoms of a sprain or strain include pain, swelling, and difficulty in walking.

Tendonitis

The tendons in your knee can get inflamed and painful. This is typically a result of over-use injuries. Activities like cycling, running, and jumping can be the cause of tendonitis. The symptoms include pain, particularly when you are using the knee in a way that aggravates inflamed tendons.

Cartilage damage

The cartilage in your knee protects the ends of the bones and provides stability to the joint. If you have a knee injury, you might do damage to the cartilage and cause additional pain and swelling in the area.

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How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated

The goals of rheumatoid arthritis treatment are to:

  • Control a patients signs and symptoms.
  • Prevent joint damage.
  • Maintain the patients quality of life and ability to function.

Joint damage generally occurs within the first two years of diagnosis, so it is important to diagnose and treat rheumatoid arthritis in the window of opportunity to prevent long-term consequences.

Treatments for rheumatoid arthritis include medications, rest, exercise, physical therapy/occupational therapy, and surgery to correct damage to the joint.

The type of treatment will depend on several factors, including the persons age, overall health, medical history, and the severity of the arthritis.

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Accessed On 6th July 2016 Http: //wwweularorg/myuploaddata/files/ra%20class%20slides%20acr: Webpdf

6 Facts about Psoriatic Arthritis

Ill make the point that the information I present here is obviously not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

But Im hoping to help lead people who may have the disease to an earlier diagnosis and suitable treatment.

By the way, Ive written many more posts on Rheumatoid Arthritis. Please have a read at this link.

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Take this test: Do you have Rheumatoid Arthritis?

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Early Stage Signs And Symptoms

A person can develop RA at any stage in their life. However, the condition most commonly develops between the ages of 30 and 50 years old.

People with early stage RA may not see redness and swelling in their joints. However, they may experience some joint tenderness and pain. A general feeling of stiffness throughout the body in the morning may suggest a person has RA.

Someone with early stage RA may also experience fatigue. Fatigue can be both mental and physical and can cause a person to feel extremely tired, preventing them from performing their usual daily tasks.

The inflammation that comes with RA may cause a person to develop a fever. A person has a fever if their body temperature rises above the typical range of 98100°F . Fever is a common sign of inflammation in people with autoimmune diseases.

A person may also experience weight loss due to the inflammation from RA. In addition, someone with fatigue and fever may experience appetite loss, which can contribute to weight loss.

As the inflammatory process of RA progresses, symptoms can worsen. A person may experience more extreme fatigue and continue to have fevers and lose weight.

Common symptoms of RA include the below.

When To Get Medical Advice

See a GP if you think you have symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, so they can try to identify the underlying cause.

Diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis quickly is important, because early treatment can prevent it getting worse and reduce the risk of joint damage.

Find out more about diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis.

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How Do I Know If I Have Rheumatoid Arthritis Or Osteoarthritis

Arthritis can be regarded as a type of joint inflammation. Both osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis attack the musculoskeletal tissues in various ways. Currently, these diseases are common and it is necessary to have a quick intervention to minimize hampering of daily life quality. While rheumatoid arthritis is a kind of autoimmune disease, osteoarthritis can be regarded as a degenerative disorder.

Put Everything In One Place

Gout Remedies You Can Use At Home

Storing all of your printed doctors visit summaries and pamphlets about rheumatology, blood tests, biologic medications, and other resources in a designated spot can help create some order and help you find information when you need it. You dont need a fancy filing system a kitchen drawer, an old binder, or simply an orderly stack on your bedside table can make a big difference. In addition to helping you keep track of important papers, controlling clutter may also improve your mood.

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Your Doctor Can’t Fully Appreciate Potential New Symptoms Via Telemedicine

In the COVID-19 pandemic era, people with rheumatoid arthritis cant always make it into the doctors office for a physical visit. But a telemedicine, or telehealth, appointment, which is unquestionably better than not checking in with health professionals at all, may not detect that the disease is progressing as well as an in-person visit.

Domingues says that rheumatologists should definitely notice if joints are swollen and warm to the touch in an office consultation signs of active inflammation but they may not catch the severity of those symptoms on a computer screen. If were not physically examining them, the communication between doctors and patients needs to be even better, Domingues says. He says to make sure that you mention how your joints feel when you wake up, how much stiffness you experience in the morning and for how long, if youre able to make a full fist early in the day, and if you see red, warm, or swollen joints. Those are the pivotal signs of worsening RA, he says.

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Imaging Test Results Help Paint A Picture

X-rays, CT scans, MRIs, and ultrasounds are all tests that can help track and detect the severity of joint and cartilage damage. Bone erosion and destruction of cartilage can happen quickly within the first two years that you have rheumatoid arthritis, and the damage may continue to develop over time.

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Some Daily Activities Are Difficult

Pay close attention to how you truly feel. Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the few diseases where subjective measures of how a patient feels are among the best predictors of how well a person will respond to treatment and how much the disease will progress. Doctors may measure severity of symptoms using both the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index and the Rheumatoid Arthritis Quality of Life questionnaire.

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